neoclassicism

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ne·o·clas·si·cism

also Ne·o·clas·si·cism  (nē′ō-klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially:
a. A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
b. A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
2. Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

ne′o·clas′sic, ne′o·clas′si·cal adj.
ne′o·clas′si·cist n.

neoclassicism

(ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a late 18th- and early 19th-century style in architecture, decorative art, and fine art, based on the imitation of surviving classical models and types
2. (Classical Music) music a movement of the 1920s, involving Hindemith, Stravinsky, etc, that sought to avoid the emotionalism of late romantic music by reviving the use of counterpoint, forms such as the classical suite, and small instrumental ensembles
ˌneoˈclassicist n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neoclassicism - revival of a classical style (in art or literature or architecture or music) but from a new perspective or with a new motivation
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Translations

neoclassicism

[ˈniːəʊˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nneoclasicismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Written largely in the neo-Classicist style, it depicts the difficult life journey of a composer and teacher, who today is virtually only known as the creator of the legendary Czech Christmas Mass.
The neo-classicist cultivated "detachment and freedom from affectation (sprezzatura)"; he "wonder[ed] at nothing (nil admirari)," while the "romanticist" had the tendency "to wonder at everything especially at himself and his own genius.
He has even had the temerity to quote with approval the contemptuous characterization of sentimental Romanticism as "spilt religion" by that scourge of the intellectual-academic Left the English neo-classicist T.
He has a reputation (often overstated) for difficulty--"every poem has to be read syllable by syllable ten times over," observed the nineteenth-century critic Jozef Tokarzewicz--and critics are still trying to decide if he was a tardy Neo-Classicist, a post-Romantic, a Parnassian pre-Symbolist, or a precocious modernist.
A third but smaller component was added (particularly in 1885--1905, the period of many of Renoir's pictures of women bathing and other nudes) by the easy-going supervision of the Neo-Classicist Charles Gleyre, a dextrous craftsman to whose studio Renoir flitted in 1861, when he had saved up enough money to live on.
For Naqsh another source of inspiration, inevitably, was Picasso and yet another was the work of great French Neo-classicist, Jean Dominique Ingres.
Certainly, the music of German neo-classicist Max Reger, as exemplified by the densely harmonic D Minor Introduction and Passacaglia, could scarcely find a more fitting arena anywhere.
However, while the best of the rest adopt the conventional corporate uniform of curtain walling, and the worst espouse neo-classicist po-mo, Sirpur House is a bespoke, handcrafted creation.
He was a brilliant satirist/technician, but with a limited poetic vision, a neo-classicist against whom the succeeding Romantic generation rebelled.
Apparently in reaction to the popular neo-classicist trend, some architects were also influenced by a desire to return to their "British" architectural roots, which for some lay wholly within the Gothic tradition.
As we saw, by the second half of the eighteenth century, school theatres got close to the entertaining professional stage performing mainly neo-classicist (7) plays.