chemotherapy

(redirected from Neoadjuvant chemotherapy)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

che·mo·ther·a·py

 (kē′mō-thĕr′ə-pē, kĕm′ō-)
n.
1. The treatment of cancer using specific chemical agents or drugs that are selectively destructive to malignant cells and tissues.
2. The treatment of disease using chemical agents or drugs that are selectively toxic to the causative agent of the disease, such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism.

che′mo·ther′a·peu′tic (-pyo͞o′tĭk) adj.
che′mo·ther′a·peu′ti·cal·ly adv.
che′mo·ther′a·pist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chemotherapy

(ˌkiːməʊˈθɛrəpɪ; kiːmə-)
n
(Medicine) treatment of disease, esp cancer, by means of chemical agents. Compare radiotherapy
ˌchemoˈtherapist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

che•mo•ther•a•py

(ˌki moʊˈθɛr ə pi, ˌkɛm oʊ-)

n.
the treatment of disease by means of chemicals that have a specific toxic effect upon the disease-producing microorganisms or that selectively destroy cancerous tissue.
[1905–10]
che`mo•ther`a•peu′tic (-ˈpyu tɪk) adj.
che`mo•ther′a•pist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·mo·ther·a·py

(kē′mō-thĕr′ə-pē)
The treatment of disease, especially cancer, with chemicals that have a specific poisonous effect on the cancerous or disease-causing cells.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chemotherapy

Med. the treatment of disease by the use of chemicals that have a toxic effect on the microorganisms causing the disease or that selectively destroy tumor tissues. — chemotherapist, n. — chemotherapeutic, adj.
See also: Remedies
a procedure that uses radioisotopes of various elements, as iodine, phosphorus, and gold, to treat cancers of the thyroid gland, lungs, and other organs.
See also: Cancer
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chemotherapy

Treatment of disease, especially cancer, and infection using drugs or chemical agents.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemotherapy - the use of chemical agents to treat or control disease (or mental illness)
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
chrysotherapy - the use of chemicals containing gold for treating diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
chemoterapie
kemoterapia
kemoterápia

chemotherapy

[ˈkiːməʊˈθerəpɪ] Nquimioterapia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chemotherapy

[ˌkiːməʊˈθɛrəpi] nchimiothérapie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

chemotherapy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

chemotherapy

[ˌkiːməʊˈθɛrəpɪ] n (Med) → chemioterapia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

che·mo·ther·a·py

n. quimioterapia, tratamiento de una enfermedad por medio de agentes químicos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chemotherapy

n (pl -pies) quimioterapia; adjuvant — quimioterapia adyuvante; consolidation — quimioterapia de consolidación; high-dose — quimioterapia a dosis altas; induction — quimioterapia de inducción; neoadjuvant — quimioterapia neoadyuvante
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The neoadjuvant chemotherapy was terminated, and she was administered an anticoagulant therapy (edoxaban).
Quagliuolo et al., "Histotype-tailored neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus standard chemotherapy in patients with high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas (ISGSTS 1001): an international, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3, multicentre trial," The Lancet Oncology, vol.
Endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography in restaging and predicting prognosis after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer.
In the Sentinel Node Biopsy Following NeoAdjuvant Chemotherapy in Biopsy Proven Node Positive Breast Cancer (SN-FNAC) trial, [26] a dual tracer technique was used to locate sentinel lymph nodes in 153 patients who were node-negative after NACT.
Measurement of residual breast cancer burden to predict survival after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol 2007;25:4414-22.
However, the available studies compared patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab to patients that did not receive trastuzumab at all or with HER2-negative tumors (4,7).
By adding a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen, groups of patients experienced longer disease control and overall survival, especially with patients who had muscle invasion.
Tumor proliferation activity shown with a Ki-67 overexpression in breast cancer is related to poor prognosis and also is predictive of neoadjuvant chemotherapy response [7].
We retrospectively analyzed 54 pre-NACT biopsies and compared both the percentage of stromal TILs and the extent of PD-L1 expression on neoplastic and inflammatory cells with the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
Moreover, it is unclear whether these features should be assessed on treatment-naive biopsy specimens or on resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Although the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor necrosis has been shown to be a strong prognostic factor, (7, 8, 15, 16) several studies have demonstrated contradictory results, (4, 9, 17) emphasizing a need for standardization in the method of histologic assessment of treatment response.
For patients whose metastatic liver tumor was unresectable initially, the optimizing treatment of an aggressive surgical resection of the primary tumor without metastasectomy with adjuvant CMT or initial neoadjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial.