neoliberalism

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Related to Neoclassical philosophy: neoclassicism, Neoclassical literature

ne·o·lib·er·al·ism

 (nē′ō-lĭb′ər-ə-lĭz′əm, -lĭb′rə-)
n.
A political theory of the late 1900s holding that personal liberty is maximized by limiting government interference in the operation of free markets.

ne′o·lib′er·al adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

neoliberalism

(ˌniːəʊˈlɪbərəˌlɪzəm; -ˈlɪbrəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a modern politico-economic theory favouring free trade, privatization, minimal government intervention in business, reduced public expenditure on social services, etc
2. (Economics) a modern politico-economic theory favouring free trade, privatization, minimal government intervention in business, reduced public expenditure on social services, etc
ˌneoˈliberal adj, n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ne•o•lib•er•al•ism

(ˌni oʊˈlɪb ər əˌlɪz əm, -ˈlɪb rə-)

n.
a moderate form of liberalism that modifies its traditional government policies, as on labor unions and taxes.
[1955–60]
ne`o•lib′er•al, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

neoliberalism

a movement that modifies classical liberalism in light of 20th-century conditions.
See also: Politics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neoliberalism - a political orientation originating in the 1960s; blends liberal political views with an emphasis on economic growth
liberalism - a political orientation that favors social progress by reform and by changing laws rather than by revolution
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He perceptively analyzes the remarkably destructive ideas found in neoclassical philosophy that informs current corporate governance theory and practice.
Unless this neoclassical philosophy is severed from our current corporate governance practices, good governance will always falter no matter how many Sarbanes-Oxley reforms we attempt.
Best are its earnest and thorough interpretations of the heroines' struggles to function as agents of connection between estate and parish and its insistence on a kind of interdependent reading of Austen and Anglicanism in terms of both neoclassical philosophy and a rapidly changing Georgian social context.