neogrammarian


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neogrammarian

(ˌniːəʊɡrəˈmɛərɪən) linguistics
n
(Linguistics) a linguist who believes there to be no exceptions to phonetic laws (and that all apparent exceptions can be otherwise explained)
adj
(Linguistics) of or pertaining to (the beliefs of) neogrammarians
Translations
Junggrammatiker
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Neogrammarian Era they paid special attention to the Veps language and even called it the Finnic Sanscrit (Grunthal 2015 : 22), believing it possessed a certain archaic character that may shed light on the history of the Finnic linguistic community evolution.
According to the author, as vowel harmony is a regular process, conditioned by a specific phonetic-phonological context, it may be included in the neogrammarian assumptions.
The first volume deals with lower-level concerns, and is consistent with Neogrammarian and Structuralist approaches.
In phonetics, we have the mechanic Neogrammarian sound laws, and in semantics we can rely on the irreversible grammaticalization paths that can be framed in terms of categorial metaphors.
The term itself was introduced by Meillet in 1912 but, as indicated by Lehmann (2002: 1-7), the sources of grammaticalization are to be sought in Condillac's Essai sur l'origine des connaissances humaines of 1746, Humboldt's "On the genesis of grammatical forms and their influence on the evolution of ideas" of 1822, and in German Neogrammarian Georg von der Gabelentz's Die Sprachwissenschaft of 1891 (cf.
This principle, stated by Hetzron 1976 within the context of Semitic, goes back at least to the 1880s and the Neogrammarian Carl Osthoff.
But this cannot pay out until the Neogrammarian method has been introduced, which does not happen till Chapter 14.
According to Mattos e silva (2002, 2003), the neogrammarian theory of language has been kept intact by present day researchers on grammaticalization.
It has often been noted that, under the strictest definition, grammaticalization is unidirectional by definition, rather in the way that Neogrammarian sound change is by definition regular.
10) As he wrote in "Apologia," at first "the exactitude of neogrammarian linguistics with its laws 'without exceptions' was extremely refreshing and appealing to me" (xvi).
1996, The Neogrammarian Hypothesis and Pandemic Irregularity : 135-156, in M.
I take it that the definition of the emphasis 'on the tasks, methods and aims of linguistic scholarship in the past, rather than on ideas and theories' is intended not to deny a symbiosis between theory and method (of the sort well illustrated in the treatment of the influence of Neogrammarian theory on philosophical methods, for example, at pp.