Neopagan


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Related to Neopagan: Neupogen

Ne·o·pa·gan

or Ne·o-Pa·gan  (nē′ō-pā′gən)
adj.
Of or relating to Neopaganism.
n.
An adherent of Neopaganism.

neopagan

(ˌniːəʊˈpeɪɡən) theol
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) an advocate of the revival of paganism, a modern pagan
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) of or pertaining to a modern revival of paganism
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardinal Koch acknowledged the lack of vigorous Christian resistance to Nazism and the Holocaust, which he called a godless, antiChristian and neopagan ideology", Yet we Christians cannot dismiss our complicity in the horrific developments, and above all to confess that Christian resistance to the boundless inhuman brutality of the ideologically and racially based National Socialism did not display that vigour and clarity which one should by rights have expected.
He was an influential neopagan witch, founder of the Museum of Witchcraft and friend of notorious occultist Aleister Crowley.
39) But we may wonder whether Hythlodaeus's presentation of their religious and social practices indicates merely a generally positive evaluation by More of the good that can be achieved outside Christianity, or is also a critique of humanist attempts to see a revival of learning as necessarily neopagan and perhaps an argument that an apparently ideal and Platonic Utopia must collapse into a self-seeking, self-satisfied, incoherent blend of Stoicizing Christianity with Epicureanism--at least as some of the humanists misunderstood Epicureanism.
The celebration stretches back to the pagan festival of Beltane and falls exactly half a year on from November 1, which also marks various neopagan festivals.
On the night of his initiation into his father's neopagan Asatru group (a modern incarnation of a pre-Christian Nordic religion), Sune Frandsen, 15 years old and eager to be part of this secret band of brothers, disappears into the forest.
New Age, Neopagan, and New Religious Movements: Alternative Spirituality in Contemporary America.
The first section of this book explores nonviolence concepts in spiritual and religious traditions, with chapters focusing on Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, Zoroastrian, Christian, Muslim, Sikh, Baha'i, Western Neopagan, Japanese Shinto, and Western Atheist/Humanist doctrines of nonviolence.
If one was coming of age in the contemporary neopagan movement in America, at least one of her books would have been obligatory on one's bookshelf; among the numerous, notable volumes that are her legacy one will find Women in Myth and Legend (1981), Seasons of the Witch: Poetry and Songs to the Goddess (1992), The Goddess Path: Myths, Invocations, and Rituals (1999), The Encyclopedia of Celtic Myth and Folklore (2004), and finally, Magical Gardens: Cultivating Soil & Spirit (2012).
There is a revolution among the Pagan and Witchcraft communities, a movement away from prescribed ritual and neopagan practices and a reaching back toward what Foxwood says is in the heart of any true witch: a thundering call deep within their very blood to become a healer, a reckoner, a protector of magical arts, and a guardian of the wild woods.
They lied about God, for they were either militantly atheistic in nature or neopagan in character.
He acknowledges Tolkien's use of pagan Norse tales and mythology, but concludes that the mythology is not a neopagan tale.
I will then discuss the revival of Druidry (also known as Druidism) within the context of Neopagan earth worship, and provide an overview of ADF Druid beliefs and practices, including their ritual structure.