Neopagan


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Related to Neopagan: Neupogen

Ne·o·pa·gan

or Ne·o-Pa·gan  (nē′ō-pā′gən)
adj.
Of or relating to Neopaganism.
n.
An adherent of Neopaganism.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

neopagan

(ˌniːəʊˈpeɪɡən) theol
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) an advocate of the revival of paganism, a modern pagan
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) of or pertaining to a modern revival of paganism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Haecker believes that he is charged with living under this cloud of tyranny and moral ambivalence, not least because of the handful of young Germans, including his own children, whom he sees attempting to live out the Christian life in a post-Christian, neopagan era: "[These young people] will live under a cloud, as I do.
In the twentieth century, elements of ceremonial magic and practices of cunning folk were combined with the culturally constructed idea of a sect of witches to give birth first to modern Wicca in England and then to other neopagan movements in North America.
(44) Ronald Hutton, Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999); Chas Clifton, Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America (Lanham md: Alta Mira Press, 2006); Sarah Pike, New Age and Neopagan Religions in America (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004).
He writes a lot about his Catholic background, but constantly attributes lucky incidents in his life to "the gods," a Neopagan metaphor that becomes tiresome and somewhat offensive after the first few times it appears.
He was an influential neopagan witch, founder of the Museum of Witchcraft and friend of notorious occultist Aleister Crowley.
The majority of the Greek population are Greek Orthodox Christians, though there are other Christian, Muslim, Jewish, and neopagan minorities.
This method of protection is also said to work against ghosts and malignant spirits." Also highly recommended for metaphysical studies shelves is author Morgan Daimler's previous title, "Pagan Portals--Fairy Witchcraft: A Neopagan's Guide to the Celtic Fairy Faith" (9781782793434, $9.95 pbk / $3.03 Kindle).
(39) But we may wonder whether Hythlodaeus's presentation of their religious and social practices indicates merely a generally positive evaluation by More of the good that can be achieved outside Christianity, or is also a critique of humanist attempts to see a revival of learning as necessarily neopagan and perhaps an argument that an apparently ideal and Platonic Utopia must collapse into a self-seeking, self-satisfied, incoherent blend of Stoicizing Christianity with Epicureanism--at least as some of the humanists misunderstood Epicureanism.
The celebration stretches back to the pagan festival of Beltane and falls exactly half a year on from November 1, which also marks various neopagan festivals.
On the night of his initiation into his father's neopagan Asatru group (a modern incarnation of a pre-Christian Nordic religion), Sune Frandsen, 15 years old and eager to be part of this secret band of brothers, disappears into the forest.
New Age, Neopagan, and New Religious Movements: Alternative Spirituality in Contemporary America.