neopaganism


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Related to neopaganism: Polyarchy

Ne·o·pa·gan·ism

or Ne·o-Pa·gan·ism  (nē′ō-pā′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Any of various religious movements arising chiefly in the United Kingdom and the United States in the late 1900s that combine worship of pagan nature deities, particularly of the earth, with benign witchcraft.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

neopaganism

(ˌniːəʊˈpeɪɡənɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) theol a revival of paganism, modern paganism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

neopaganism

the revival of paganism. — neopagan, adj.neopaganist, n., adj.
See also: Religion
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Especially given the political climate the last few years, I don't think either the administration or the student press is going to be that understanding about Nordic neopaganism or Kristian Vang."
They can challenge traditional gender roles, identities, and performances, as evidenced in Spiritualism and many forms of Neopaganism. New religions are a space in which Americans negotiate gender and power.
Given the various transformations of Neopaganism in Canada and around the world, more than a passing census mention seems warranted, especially in light of Bibby's chapter on spirituality and inventories of the spiritual marketplace.
This leads him to speculate that neo-tribalism best describes "the sort of 'anachronistic' modern subcultural identities which themselves invoke a sense of the 'primitive,' the cultish, and the religious and 'divine'" (136), such as neopaganism and the leather and ink subcultures referenced in Marr's books.
This includes the revival of traditions such as Wicca, homeopathy, magic and the occult, new variations such as Neopaganism and the Burning Man festival, and also the western embrace of Eastern religious and philosophical traditions such as Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism, as well as some of the martial arts disciplines.
Esoteric Magic was invented in the 19th century, and the book goes through related traditions: the Theosophical Society, the general Victorian occult revival, Aleister Crowley and the OTO, neopaganism, Satanism, and the New Age movement.
"Neopaganism" is an umbrella term used to describe a diverse and non-hierarchical movement of people practicing earth-based spirituality who are reviving ancient European polytheistic nature religions that predate Christianity (Adler 2006).
Modern paganism, also known as contemporary paganism, and neopaganism, is a group of contemporary religious movements influenced by or claiming to be derived from the various historical pagan beliefs of pre-modern Europe.
Seventeen papers are included, exploring such specific topics as rethinking place and belonging among Angolan Christians in Lisbon, the metamorphoses of neopaganism in traditionally Catholic countries in Southern Europe, pluralizing religiosity in the everyday practice of Greek Orthodoxy, religious belonging and new ways of being Italian in the self-perception of second-generation immigrants in Italy, religious rites and Afro-Brazilian associations in Portugal, mosque controversies and the religious life of Pakistani immigrants in Greece, the multiplicity of religious expressions among Albanian Muslim women in Macedonia, Pentecostalism and ethnic minorities in Barcelona, and religious education as a cultural battlefield in Greece.
Lothlorien was founded in the mid-1980s in Indiana, but it carries forward a countercultural spirit, one heavily influenced by neopaganism, one of the many outgrowths of the 1960s-era exploration of new spiritualities.