logical positivism

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Related to Neopositivism: logical positivism

logical positivism

n.
A philosophy asserting the primacy of observation in assessing the truth of statements of fact and holding that metaphysical and subjective arguments not based on observable data are meaningless. Also called logical empiricism.

logical positivism

n
(Philosophy) a philosophical theory that holds to be meaningful only those propositions that can be analysed by the tools of logic into elementary propositions that are either tautological or are empirically verifiable. It therefore rejects metaphysics, theology, and sometimes ethics as meaningless

log′ical pos′itivism


n.
a philosophical movement that rejects all transcendental metaphysics, statements of fact being held to be meaningful only if they have verifiable consequences in experience and in statements of logic, mathematics, or philosophy, with such statements of fact deriving their validity from the rules of language. Also called log′ical empir′icism.
[1930–35]
log′ical pos′itivist, n.

logical positivism

positivism, def. 2.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logical positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
empiricism, empiricist philosophy, sensationalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
Comtism - Auguste Comte's positivistic philosophy that metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top
References in periodicals archive ?
Manuel Illi closes the first section of the volume by analyzing Broch's affinity with Neopositivism as well as early Romanticist theories of language and symbolism.
Specifically, the discussion of rationality under the rubrics of universality and relativism can be traced to the now-defunct debate originated in the United Kingdom largely as a re-examination of the implications for British neopositivism of E.
Lebow is famous for challenging the inherent philistinism of neopositivism in American social science.
As we have seen, Idealizational theory of science has never been taken into account by Neopositivism, especially for its instrumental conception of science.