Neoptolemus


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Related to Neoptolemus: Andromache, Polyxena, Idomeneus, Demodocus

Ne·op·tol·e·mus

 (nē′ŏp-tŏl′ə-məs)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Achilles who killed Priam during the taking of Troy.

Neoptolemus

(ˌniːɒpˈtɒləməs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a son of Achilles and slayer of King Priam of Troy. Also called: Pyrrhus
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References in classic literature ?
For this reason the Iliad and the Odyssey each furnish the subject of one tragedy, or, at most, of two; while the Cypria supplies materials for many, and the Little Iliad for eight--the Award of the Arms, the Philoctetes, the Neoptolemus, the Eurypylus, the Mendicant Odysseus, the Laconian Women, the Fall of Ilium, the Departure of the Fleet.
His work included the adjudgment of the arms of Achilles to Odysseus, the madness of Aias, the bringing of Philoctetes from Lemnos and his cure, the coming to the war of Neoptolemus who slays Eurypylus, son of Telephus, the making of the wooden horse, the spying of Odysseus and his theft, along with Diomedes, of the Palladium: the analysis concludes with the admission of the wooden horse into Troy by the Trojans.
Grief greater than this I could not know, not even though I were to hear of the death of my father, who is now in Phthia weeping for the loss of me his son, who am here fighting the Trojans in a strange land for the accursed sake of Helen, nor yet though I should hear that my son is no more--he who is being brought up in Scyros--if indeed Neoptolemus is still living.
They say the Myrmidons returned home safely under Achilles' son Neoptolemus; so also did the valiant son of Poias, Philoctetes.
Among her topics are Penthesiliea and Memnon: two ways to fight Achilles, Neoptolemus: a new Aeacid in the field, suffering Trojans and victorious Achaeans, and heroic and divine power.
M Winsler, C Hall, NJ London, JP Neoptolemus. Relationship of diagnostic serum amylase to aetiology and prognosis in acute pancreatitis.
In his tragedy, Euripides portrays the story of Neoptolemus, who marries Andromache right after the fall of Troy.
In the meantime the Greeks--who were having a hard time of it at Troy following the deaths of Ajax and Achilles--had kidnapped the Trojan soothsayer, who revealed to them that they would never take Troy until they had sent for Achilles' son, Neoptolemus, given him his father's armor, and brought Philoctetes' bow back with them to Troy.
It may, at first glance, seem improbable, even bizarre, to imagine battle-hardened Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen sitting through, let alone caring about, a program of long-winded hexameter soliloquies from oddly named characters like Neoptolemus and Tecmessa.