Neoptolemus


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Related to Neoptolemus: Andromache, Polyxena, Idomeneus, Demodocus

Ne·op·tol·e·mus

 (nē′ŏp-tŏl′ə-məs)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Achilles who killed Priam during the taking of Troy.

Neoptolemus

(ˌniːɒpˈtɒləməs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a son of Achilles and slayer of King Priam of Troy. Also called: Pyrrhus
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References in classic literature ?
For this reason the Iliad and the Odyssey each furnish the subject of one tragedy, or, at most, of two; while the Cypria supplies materials for many, and the Little Iliad for eight--the Award of the Arms, the Philoctetes, the Neoptolemus, the Eurypylus, the Mendicant Odysseus, the Laconian Women, the Fall of Ilium, the Departure of the Fleet.
His work included the adjudgment of the arms of Achilles to Odysseus, the madness of Aias, the bringing of Philoctetes from Lemnos and his cure, the coming to the war of Neoptolemus who slays Eurypylus, son of Telephus, the making of the wooden horse, the spying of Odysseus and his theft, along with Diomedes, of the Palladium: the analysis concludes with the admission of the wooden horse into Troy by the Trojans.
Grief greater than this I could not know, not even though I were to hear of the death of my father, who is now in Phthia weeping for the loss of me his son, who am here fighting the Trojans in a strange land for the accursed sake of Helen, nor yet though I should hear that my son is no more--he who is being brought up in Scyros--if indeed Neoptolemus is still living.
She then gives birth to his son, Molossus, and, as the story progresses, Neoptolemus decides to also marry Hermione, with whom he never has a child.
She discusses the helpless witness: Achilles, Patroclus, and the portrayal of vulnerability in the Iliad; spectatorship, agency, and alienation in Sophocles' Trachiniae; from murderer to messenger: body, speech, and justice in Greek tragedy; and Neoptolemus between agent and spectator in Sophocles' Philoctetes.
The case of Neoptolemus "of Tlos" (and other Ptolemaic epigrams), Studi Classici e Orientali, 53 (2010), 67-138.
Mossman (1996: 149): "It is because Neoptolemus is the boy's father that Andromache takes refuge at the temple of Thetis".
It may, at first glance, seem improbable, even bizarre, to imagine battle-hardened Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen sitting through, let alone caring about, a program of long-winded hexameter soliloquies from oddly named characters like Neoptolemus and Tecmessa.
At first the blameless widow of Hector, who as concubine to Neoptolemus is forced to serve in an alien household and bear children to her master, she appears a classic suffering victim.
Polyxena offers Neoptolemus a limited range of options of where to strike, in the neck or chest (563-4), baring her breasts as she does so.
At first, Neoptolemus, following Odysseus's instructions, attempts to capture Philoctetes and the bow through a deceitful strategy, which is of considerable use so that Philoctetes by and by takes Neoptolemus as a reliable friend and entrusts his bow to this young man.
Odysseus in his wiliness needs to recruit the noble Neoptolemus to the effort to deceive Philoctetes into surrendering his bow, and the young man resists the strategy that would require him to lie.