Nereid

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Related to Nereids: Oreads

Ne·re·id

 (nîr′ē-ĭd)
n.
1. Greek Mythology One of the sea nymphs, the 50 daughters of Nereus.
2. A satellite of Neptune.

[Latin Nērēïs, Nērēïd-, from Greek, from Nēreus, Nereus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nereid

(ˈnɪərɪɪd)
n, pl Nereides (nəˈriːəˌdiːz)
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth any of the 50 sea nymphs who were the daughters of the sea god Nereus
[C17: via Latin from Greek Nērēid, from Nereus; compare Latin nāre to swim]

Nereid

(ˈnɪərɪɪd)
n
(Astronomy) a satellite of the planet Neptune, in a large and highly eccentric orbit
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ne•re•id

(ˈnɪər i ɪd)

n.
(sometimes l.c.) a sea nymph, one of Nereus' 50 daughters.
[< Latin Nērēid- < Greek, s. of Nērēís. See Nereus, -id1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nereid - (Greek mythology) any of the 50 sea nymphs who were daughters of the sea god NereusNereid - (Greek mythology) any of the 50 sea nymphs who were daughters of the sea god Nereus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
sea nymph - (Greek mythology) a water nymph who was the daughter of Oceanus or Nereus
Thetis - (Greek mythology) one of the 50 Nereids; mother of Achilles by Peleus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

nereid

[ˈnɪərɪɪd] Nnereida f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nereid

n (Myth) → Nereide f, → Meerjungfrau f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Nereid

[ˈnɪərɪɪd] n (Myth) → nereide f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The cascades, somewhat rebellious nymphs though they were, poured forth their waters brighter and clearer than crystal: they scattered over the bronze triton and nereids their waves of foam, which glistened like fire in the rays of the sun.
There were also Clymene, Ianeira and Ianassa, Maera, Oreithuia and Amatheia of the lovely locks, with other Nereids who dwell in the depths of the sea.
2) Yet another gift, of all gifts the most Prized by our fatherland, we boast-- The might of the horse, the might of the sea; Our fame, Poseidon, we owe to thee, Son of Kronos, our king divine, Who in these highways first didst fit For the mouth of horses the iron bit; Thou too hast taught us to fashion meet For the arm of the rower the oar-blade fleet, Swift as the Nereids' hundred feet As they dance along the brine.
Our predecessors' belief in fairies may have originated in pre-Christian times when rivers, trees, hills and pools were regarded as the homes of nature spirits like dryads, nereids and oreads.
In both locations, most positive macroinvertebrates were polychaete worms, mostly nereids, capitellids, and spionids, although a high proportion of mud snails was positive in Delaware Bay.
The sunken floors design is inspired by the ancient Roman baths of Caracalla and features maritime images of Neptune, dolphins, tritons, Nereids, triton centaurs and tridents, reflecting the importance of the sea to Liverpool's 19th century prosperity.
in which Nereids, rising through water to the western sunset,
WHO was the mother of the Nereids in Greek mythology?
It's what the French brand calls as savoir faire, or the confidence and ability to do the appropriate thing in any situtaion, being named after Nereids of Greek mythology, the sea nymph daughters of Nereus who are known to possess the power to reinvent themselves.
Primarily selfportraits, the images capture the artist infiltrating the ancient tales, painting herself in the poses of Aphrodite, Atlas, Sisyphus, and any number of Nereids, caryatids, and Amazons.
From 1912 to 1913, at the start of his so-called metaphysical period, he produced a set of paintings of Ariadne and he returned repeatedly to depictions of the enigmatic figure of the exiled Cretan princess throughout his life, completing as many works on the topic as there are Nereids in the ocean.