Nerium oleander


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Noun1.Nerium oleander - an ornamental but poisonous flowering shrub having narrow evergreen leaves and clusters of fragrant white to pink or red flowers: native to East Indies but widely cultivated in warm regions
genus Nerium, Nerium - one species: oleander
poisonous plant - a plant that when touched or ingested in sufficient quantity can be harmful or fatal to an organism
References in periodicals archive ?
Nerium Oleander is one of the most toxic, commonly grown garden plants in the world, as ingesting any part of it can be deadly, especially for children.
EVERGREEN shrub Nerium oleander is fast-growing and makes a great patio plant.
Two examples are yew (Taxus spp.) and oleander (Nerium oleander).
NERIUM OLEANDER REALLY common in southern Europe, oleander is covered in fragrant pink, red or white blossoms.
NERIUM OLEANDER Really common in southern Europe, oleander is one of the first plants you will spot on your holidays as you leave the airport - it lines motorways and streets and is covered in fragrant pink, red or white blossoms.
PLANT OF THE WEEK NERIUM OLEANDER Really common in southern Europe, oleander is one of the first plants you will spot on your holidays as you leave the airport - it lines motorways and streets and is covered in fragrant pink, red or white blossoms.
Extracts Days after treatment 1 3 7 14 21 28 Control 7 0.75 10 12.7 8.3 0 Reedia longifolia 0 0.5 0.25 4.25 2.25 0.75 Garcinia xanthochymus 0 0 0 1.25 5.75 0 Plumbago scandens 0 0 0 2.75 0 0 Hoveni dulcis 0 0.25 1 3.25 1 0 Malphighia glabra 0 3.25 3.5 4 0.5 0 Euphorbia tirucalli 0 2 1.75 6.25 2 0.25 Nerium oleander 0.25 0.5 1.75 3.5 2.25 0 Extracts Eggs hatched X [+ or -] S.
Melo, "Experimental intoxication by oleander (Nerium oleander) in guinea pigs (Caviaporcellus)," Toxicology Letters S56.
Boukir, "Antibacterial activity and chemical composition of the essential oil from flowers of nerium oleander," Electronic Journal of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
Certainly, not all herbs are suitable for the preparation of teas, and some plant species may be extremely toxic to humans (e.g., various cultivars of Nerium oleander, which contain cardiac glycosides--oleandrin, oleandroside, nerioside, and digitoxigenin).