neurocognitive

(redirected from Neurocognitive deficit)

neurocognitive

(ˌnjʊərəˈkɒɡnɪtɪv)
adj
(Medicine) of or relating to cognitive functions associated with particular areas of the brain
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References in periodicals archive ?
Items 1 to 7 measure neurocognitive functions and items 8 to 15 measure social cognitive function; for this study, each set of factors was assessed separately to compare neurocognitive deficit (GEOPTE 1-7, range 1-35) and social cognitive impairment (GEOPTE 8-15, range 1-40).
No deaths occurred, but two cases had sequelae of neurocognitive deficit or hearing loss, Dr.
Part of the association of neurocognitive deficit with anesthesia may be due to the innate differences between children requiring surgery and diagnostic procedures and those not requiring them.
Neurocognitive deficit in schizophrenia: A quantitative review of the evidence.
People with mild neurocognitive deficit feel some mild negative effects on at least two types of everyday functioning.
Amnesia, according to Lovell and colleagues (12), (13), is most predictive of a prolonged neurocognitive deficit. Other symptoms include nausea, double or blurred vision, dizziness, fatigue, feeling foggy or sluggish, and difficulty with concentration.
The greater the reduction in reserve, the more likely that an impairment threshold will be crossed producing an observable neurocognitive deficit. Second, at a more specific conceptual level, perhaps aging and HIV infection have a common or significantly overlapping neuropathological locus therefore impairing the same neurocognitive processes.
Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder suffer from an "extensive neurocognitive deficit" that is similar to that seen in stabilized patients with schizophrenia, Spanish investigators have reported.
Strong associations existed for veterans with persisting neurocognitive deficit, but no associations for veterans without cerebral dysfunction.
Table 1 Types and degrees of neurocognitive deficit (adapted from Harvey & Sharma, 2002) Mild Moderate Severe Perceptual skills Distractibility Verbal learning Recognition memory Recall memory Executive functions Verbal naming Visuo-spatial skills Attention/Vigilance Working memory Motor speed Verbal Fluency Table 2 Productivity of the authors Number of Number of Percentage authors articles of authors 204 1 56,51 91 2 25,21 25 3 6,93 9 4 2,49 5 5 1,39 2 6 0,55 3 7 0,83 5 8 1,39 1 9 0,28 16 [greater 4,43 than or equal to] 10 Table 3 Most productive authors Author Number of articles Crespo-Facorro, B.
Neurocognitive deficits, craving, and abstinence among alcohol-dependent individuals following detoxification.
The others she highlighted were a large longitudinal observational study that demonstrated that persistent maternal postnatal depression was strongly associated with a variety of pediatric behavioral disturbances documented during assessments at ages 3.5, 16, and 18 years; a Philadelphia study showing that multiple traumatic stressful events or any assaultive trauma experienced by children or adolescents were independently associated with significant psychopathology and neurocognitive deficits; and a Dutch brain MRI study that pinpointed a reduction in gray-matter volume in the anterior cingulate cortex as a potential key mediator of the neurobiologic aftereffects of childhood sexual abuse.