neurocognitive

(redirected from Neurocognitive deficit)

neurocognitive

(ˌnjʊərəˈkɒɡnɪtɪv)
adj
(Medicine) of or relating to cognitive functions associated with particular areas of the brain
References in periodicals archive ?
Items 1 to 7 measure neurocognitive functions and items 8 to 15 measure social cognitive function; for this study, each set of factors was assessed separately to compare neurocognitive deficit (GEOPTE 1-7, range 1-35) and social cognitive impairment (GEOPTE 8-15, range 1-40).
No deaths occurred, but two cases had sequelae of neurocognitive deficit or hearing loss, Dr.
Part of the association of neurocognitive deficit with anesthesia may be due to the innate differences between children requiring surgery and diagnostic procedures and those not requiring them.
Neurocognitive deficit in schizophrenia: A quantitative review of the evidence.
People with mild neurocognitive deficit feel some mild negative effects on at least two types of everyday functioning.
Amnesia, according to Lovell and colleagues (12), (13), is most predictive of a prolonged neurocognitive deficit.
The greater the reduction in reserve, the more likely that an impairment threshold will be crossed producing an observable neurocognitive deficit.
In contrast, among the veterans who did not have a neurocognitive deficit, only 1 of 11 veterans (9%) with PTSD had impaired sleep.
Included will be summary information on recent findings that demonstrate neuroprotective effects of DX-88 on brain ischemia and reperfusion injury in an animal study, indicating the potential for DX-88 in the treatment or prevention of neurocognitive deficit during on-pump open heart surgery (CABG).
Table 1 Types and degrees of neurocognitive deficit (adapted from Harvey & Sharma, 2002) Mild Moderate Severe Perceptual skills Distractibility Verbal learning Recognition memory Recall memory Executive functions Verbal naming Visuo-spatial skills Attention/Vigilance Working memory Motor speed Verbal Fluency Table 2 Productivity of the authors Number of Number of Percentage authors articles of authors 204 1 56,51 91 2 25,21 25 3 6,93 9 4 2,49 5 5 1,39 2 6 0,55 3 7 0,83 5 8 1,39 1 9 0,28 16 [greater 4,43 than or equal to] 10 Table 3 Most productive authors Author Number of articles Crespo-Facorro, B.
While they have been performed successfully for many years, traditional "on-pump" procedures can be associated with potential risk factors including stroke, post-operative bleeding, heart muscle damage, renal failure and neurocognitive deficit.
The patient benefits of undergoing beating heart rather than stopped heart bypass surgery have been increasingly well documented and can include less blood loss, less heart muscle damage and potentially a lower incidence of neurocognitive deficit following the procedure.