neurocognitive

(redirected from Neurocognitive deficit)

neurocognitive

(ˌnjʊərəˈkɒɡnɪtɪv)
adj
(Medicine) of or relating to cognitive functions associated with particular areas of the brain
References in periodicals archive ?
No deaths occurred, but two cases had sequelae of neurocognitive deficit or hearing loss, Dr.
Part of the association of neurocognitive deficit with anesthesia may be due to the innate differences between children requiring surgery and diagnostic procedures and those not requiring them.
Neurocognitive deficit in schizophrenia: A quantitative review of the evidence.
People with mild neurocognitive deficit feel some mild negative effects on at least two types of everyday functioning.
Amnesia, according to Lovell and colleagues (12), (13), is most predictive of a prolonged neurocognitive deficit.
In contrast, among the veterans who did not have a neurocognitive deficit, only 1 of 11 veterans (9%) with PTSD had impaired sleep.
Included will be summary information on recent findings that demonstrate neuroprotective effects of DX-88 on brain ischemia and reperfusion injury in an animal study, indicating the potential for DX-88 in the treatment or prevention of neurocognitive deficit during on-pump open heart surgery (CABG).
While they have been performed successfully for many years, traditional "on-pump" procedures can be associated with potential risk factors including stroke, post-operative bleeding, heart muscle damage, renal failure and neurocognitive deficit.
The patient benefits of undergoing beating heart rather than stopped heart bypass surgery have been increasingly well documented and can include less blood loss, less heart muscle damage and potentially a lower incidence of neurocognitive deficit following the procedure.
The findings establish the fact that a majority of patients have a neurocognitive deficit and suffer from MHE, an indication for which there are no drugs approved and with an unmet need for a safe and well-tolerated treatment option," stated Dr.
Conventional radiation for pediatric brain tumors has been associated with long-term neurocognitive deficits, including decreases in IQ, and difficulties with attention, processing speed and executive skills.
Letter to the editor: Plausible explanations for neurocognitive deficits in ME/CFS, aggravation of neurocognitive impairment induced by exertion.