neurocomputer


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neurocomputer

(ˈnjʊərəʊkəmˌpjuːtə)
n
(Computer Science) a type of computer designed to mimic the action of the human brain by use of an electronic neural network. Also called: neural computer
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Experts are working on the social media platform Neurochat, which would allow people to use it without hands, said Natalia Galkina, the general director of the program, and Alexander Kaplan, the head of Moscow State University's lab of neurophysiology and neurocomputer interfaces, according to RT.
Searle's argument presents a serious challenge to Churchland's eliminative materialism and the associated view that the material brain is just a neurocomputer.
It appears that Japan was the first to recognize the enormous potential of neural networks, and some European sources claim that this country is already working on a second-generation neurocomputer.
The drawback is that the solution offered by the neurocomputer cannot be as exact as the human-written version because, after all, it represents merely an approximation, a near-optimum solution.
has a line of neurocomputer coprocessors for machine-vision applications.
A two-year, $389,000 contract to research the uses of neural computers to detect nuclear warheads in space has been awarded by the SDIO to Hecht-Nielsen Neurocomputer Corp.
A "controller" built into the neurocomputer then determined whether there was significant agreement between the three layers and, if agreement was reached, rendered a response.
The prototype chip is also a step toward neurocomputers.
The two main categories consist of neurocomputers based on standard integrated circuits and ASIC.
Robert Hecht-Nielsen, inventor of one of the earliest neurocomputers, defines a neural network as a computing system made up of a number of simple, highly interconnected processing elements which process information by their dynamic state responses to external inputs (Caudill |8~).
Such hybrid machines are indeed beginning to appear under the label of neurocomputers.
Of course, visionary dreams of bioelectronic neurocomputers and microelectronic neuroprosetheses are unavoidable and exciting, but they should not obscure the numerous practical problems.