neuroleptic

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neu·ro·lep·tic

 (no͝or′ə-lĕp′tĭk, nyo͝or′-)
n.
An antipsychotic or anesthetic drug that causes apathy and decreased affect.

[French neuroleptique : neuro-, nerve (from Greek; see neuro-) + -leptique, affecting (from Greek lēptikos, seizing, from lēptos, seized, from lambanein, lēp-, to seize, take).]

neu′ro·lep′tic adj.

neuroleptic

(ˌnjʊərəʊˈlɛptɪk)
adj
(Pharmacology) capable of affecting the brain, esp by reducing the intensity of nerve function; tranquillizing
n
(Pharmacology) a neuroleptic drug; major tranquillizer, used in the treatment of psychoses

an•ti•psy•chot•ic

(ˌæn ti saɪˈkɒt ɪk, ˌæn taɪ-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to any of various drugs used in the treatment of psychosis, esp. schizophrenia, and severe states of mania, depression, or paranoia.
n.
2. Also called neuroleptic. an antipsychotic drug.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neuroleptic - tranquilizer used to treat psychotic conditions when a calming effect is desiredneuroleptic - tranquilizer used to treat psychotic conditions when a calming effect is desired
chlorpromazine, Thorazine - a drug (trade name Thorazine) derived from phenothiazine that has antipsychotic effects and is used as a sedative and tranquilizer
clozapine, Clozaril - an antipsychotic drug (trade name Clozaril) used as a sedative and for treatment-resistant schizophrenia; know to have few side effects
diphenylbutyl piperidine - a group of antipsychotic drugs used mainly in the treatment of schizophrenia
fluphenazine - tranquilizer used to treat psychotic disorders
Haldol, haloperidol - tranquilizer (trade name Haldol) used to treat some psychotic disorders and Tourette's syndrome
loxapine, Loxitane - a tranquilizer (trade name Loxitane) used to treat schizophrenia
Moban, molindone - antipsychotic drug (trade name Moban) used in the treatment of schizophrenia
prochlorperazine - antipsychotic and antiemetic drug used to treat schizophrenia and to combat nausea and vomiting
Mellaril, thioridazine - a tranquilizer (trade name Mellaril) used to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders
Navane, thiothixene - a tranquilizer (trade name Navane) used to treat schizophrenia
antianxiety agent, ataractic, ataractic agent, ataractic drug, tranquilizer, tranquilliser, tranquillizer - a drug used to reduce stress or tension without reducing mental clarity
Eskalith, Lithane, lithium carbonate, Lithonate - a white powder (LiCO3) used in manufacturing glass and ceramics and as a drug; the drug (trade names Lithane or Lithonate or Eskalith) is used to treat some forms of depression and manic episodes of manic-depressive disorder
Translations

neu·ro·lep·tic

n. neuroléptico, agente tranquilizante, pertenece a la clase psicotrópica de fármacos usada en el tratamiento de psicosis, esp. esquizofrenia;
anesthesia ___anestesia con el uso de un ___.

neuroleptic

adj & n neuroléptico
References in periodicals archive ?
2% of patients receiving neuroleptics and can be diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) criteria (Table 1).
It is suggested that the ability to create NMS by neuroleptics is associated with their ability to block dopamine in the nigrostriatal pathway, mesocortical pathway, and hypothalamic nucleus.
Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is an uncommon but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to neuroleptics and characterized by a distinctive clinical syndrome of mental status change, rigidity, fever, and dysautonomia.
Her family members denied any use of neuroleptics or other dopamine receptor-blocking agents, including antiemetics, by the patient.
However, a few years later these neuroleptics were recognized as a cause of abnormal involuntary movements.
Given that treatments for AD and DLB are mostly supportive, this scale is unlikely to change clinical practice dramatically except for alerting physicians that a trial of movement-facilitating therapies such as levodopa/carbidopa and aggressive physical therapy is indicated, and that standard neuroleptics should be avoided.
The incidence in patients receiving neuroleptics is 0.
In DSM-V, the duration for the diagnosis of TD is not specified, but it is stated to be at least few weeks in duration, in addition to the history of use of neuroleptics for at least few months.
In what concerns to treatment, the pharmacological intervention with atypical neuroleptics seems to be effective in the remission of the acute episode but its potential to prevent relapse is unclear (2).
She also added that some of the psychiatric institutions threaten, inject neuroleptics, or beat up in order to discipline the patients.
Mianserin, 15 mg/d, can be helpful, and ritanserin, 5 to 20 mg/d, produced about a 50% reduction in akathisia symptoms in 10 patients taking neuroleptics.
Neuroleptics cannot be removed by dialysis and blood concentrations decline only slowly.