grammatical gender

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grammatical gender

Modern English is largely an ungendered language. Whereas other languages might have masculine and feminine forms for nouns depending on the verbs, articles, or adjectives they are used with, English nouns by and large remain neutral. However, a personal pronoun can be inflected for gender to correspond to the gender of the person (and, in some cases, an animal) it represents.
Personal pronouns are only inflected for gender when they are in the third person and singular—first-person and second-person pronouns (singular or plural) and third-person plural pronouns remain gender neutral.
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Noun1.grammatical gender - a grammatical category in inflected languages governing the agreement between nouns and pronouns and adjectives; in some languages it is quite arbitrary but in Indo-European languages it is usually based on sex or animateness
grammatical category, syntactic category - (grammar) a category of words having the same grammatical properties
feminine - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to females or to objects classified as female
masculine - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to males or to objects classified as male
neuter - a gender that refers chiefly (but not exclusively) to inanimate objects (neither masculine nor feminine)
References in periodicals archive ?
C DIB Khp,Ansar Sindho , NDSP(Leader of Disable persons) Ms Sanam Shah (Leader of Neuter gender ) and others delivered speeches and highlighted to gender based violence in the country.
The head of state said that people living in a gender balanced society are not at all of the neuter gender, as some people try to argue to ridicule the strive toward gender equality.
As exposed in the following sections, our investigation reveals: (a) the predominant role of the morphology of an inflectionally-rich language, that is, Greek, for the inflectional adjustment of nominal loanwords (see also Aikhenvald 2000, 2006 and Ralli 2012a,b, 2013 for similar claims); (b) a certain role played by a form matching of the endings between the native nouns of the donor and those of the recipient language; (c) tendencies of the recipient language, to classify its nouns by distinguishing between native and loans in terms of inflection class and apply neuter gender to -human loans.
This article proposes to add to the English language a series of complementary pronouns and pronominal possessive adjectives that refer in the alternative to antecedents of the male gender, the female gender, or the neuter gender (when the pronoun includes reference to an artificial person, such as a corporation, or to some other inanimate entity, such as a government).
In Sanskrit, for instance, the general rule is that masculine gender prevails where at least one of the antecedents is masculine and all of the antecedents are human (or animate); elsewhere, neuter gender is found (see already Speyer 1886).