neutrino astronomy

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neutrino astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the detection of neutrinos emitted by the sun or by supernovae from which information about the solar interior can be obtained
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To keep the neutrino telescope up and running, the massive UW-Madison project at the South Pole has received a five-year, $35 million pledge from the National Science Foundation.
Other topics include the ANTARES undersea neutrino telescope, the Majorana double beta decay experiment, five years of PAMELA in orbit, the search for heavy neutrino in rare kaon decays, and experimental signatures of superstrong magnetic fields in heavy ion collisions.
Hoffman is leading the development of the Askaryan Radio Array, a neutrino telescope that uses radio frequency, which transmits best through very cold ice, to detect the particles.
Similar to IceCube in design, the ANTARES neutrino telescope (shown before deployment) lives in the Mediterranean, off the French coast.
IceCube is a high energy neutrino telescope at the geographical South Pole in Antarctica, operated by a collaboration of 250 physicists and engineers from the USA, Germany, Sweden, Belgium, Switzerland, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Barbados.
Razis said that for three years now his team has been participating in a European partnership of 24 universities, to create an under-sea neutrino telescope of an overall volume of 1-2 cubic kilometres.
Project IceCube is an international neutrino telescope being built at the South Pole through funding from the National Science Foundation, with the University of Wisconsin-Madison managing the project.
A neutrino telescope must be huge, transparent, dark, and below the earth surface to shield cosmic rays.
An array with 4,800 PMTs, called Ice Cube, has been proposed as the next high-energy neutrino telescope to take advantage of conditions at the South Pole.
This February, as the Sun began its quickening descent toward the polar horizon, the central string and three adjacent ones on the telescope's rim had been placed into the ice, thereby making AMANDA the world's largest neutrino telescope.
The results come from the IceCube neutrino telescope, a cubic kilometer of detectors buried beneath the South Pole.
The KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be unique in the world in its physics sensitivity and will provide access to scientific data that will propel research in different fields, including astronomy, dark matter searches, cosmic ray and high energy physics," the organisation added.