neutron

(redirected from Neutrons)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Neutrons: Thermal neutrons, Protons

neu·tron

 (no͞o′trŏn′, nyo͞o′-)
n. Abbr. n
The electrically neutral nucleon, a baryon composed of two down quarks and one up quark, which has a mass 1,839 times that of an electron, is stable when bound in an atomic nucleus, but has a mean lifetime of 886 seconds as a free particle. It is a basic component of all atomic nuclei except the protium isotope of hydrogen.

neutron

(ˈnjuːtrɒn)
n
(General Physics) physics a neutral elementary particle with a rest mass of 1.674 92716 × 10–27 kilogram and spin ; classified as a baryon. In the nucleus of an atom it is stable, but when free it decays
[C20: from neutral, on the model of electron]

neu•tron

(ˈnu trɒn, ˈnyu-)

n.
an elementary particle found in most atomic nuclei, having no charge, mass slightly greater than that of a proton, and spin of ½. Symbol: n
[1921; neutr (al) + -on1]

neu·tron

(no͞o′trŏn′)
An electrically neutral subatomic particle that is part of the nucleus of an atom and has a mass slightly greater than that of a proton. Beams of neutrons from nuclear reactors are used to bombard the atoms of various elements to produce fission and other nuclear reactions and to determine the atomic arrangements in molecules. See more at atom.

neutron

1. One of the three basic particles in an atoms. It is found in the nucleus and has zero charge.
2. A subatomic particle with roughly the mass of a proton and no electric charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neutron - an elementary particle with 0 charge and mass about equal to a protonneutron - an elementary particle with 0 charge and mass about equal to a proton; enters into the structure of the atomic nucleus
nucleon - a constituent (proton or neutron) of an atomic nucleus
Translations
نيوتْرون
neutron
neutron
neutron
neutron
nifteind
neutronas
neitrons
nêutron
neutrón
neutron

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn]
A. Nneutrón m
B. CPD neutron bomb Nbomba f de neutrones
neutron star Nestrella f de neutrones

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn] nneutron mneutron bomb nbombe f à neutrons

neutron

nNeutron nt

neutron

:
neutron bomb
neutron star
nNeutronenstern m

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn] nneutrone m

neutron

(ˈnjuːtron) noun
one of the particles which make up the nucleus of an atom.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditional for today's nuclear reactor physics the neutron moderation theory developed in the framework of the gas model, that is within the framework of this model and neglecting the interaction between neutrons and the nuclei moderating medium, although attempts were made that included the interaction between the nuclei of the moderating medium, for example, in [2, 3].
A new departure in holographic technology is neutron holography, involving holograms of large objects made using neutrons (a sub-atomic particle).
After a massive star explodes in a supernova, the remnant is a hot, dense ball of protons, electrons and lots of neutrons that measures about 20 kilometers across and is more massive than the sun.
It is made up of protons, electrons and lots of neutrons.
Now that the Neutrons are available, all PC users will be able experience the incredible real-world performance benefits of Corsair's 4th gen SSD technology for them," says Thi La, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the PC Components Group at Corsair.
The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line (FNPB) recently opened its shutter to receive neutrons for the first time.
power reactors, water is used to slow down the neutrons so that they can be effectively captured by the uranium nuclei and this process can proceed.
This Special Issue of the Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (Parts 1 and 2) contains papers from the International Conference on Precision Measurements with Slow Neutrons held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD, April 5-7, 2004.
Soil water content is estimated by lowering the neutron source into the ground through the access tube, and counting the number of thermalised neutrons that find their way back to the detector.
In 1998, the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) joined forces to advocate the construction of a national facility that would provide neutrons to support a wide spectrum of scientific and engineering research.
Like water spraying from a rock washed by a garden hose, neutrons from the beam will 'scatter' from a target material in a way that reveals its structures and properties," project sources explain.
When they do, they dislodge neutrons, subatomic particles from elements in the moon's rocky soil.