New Ager


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New Age

adj.
1. Of or relating to a complex of spiritual and consciousness-raising movements originating in the 1970s and covering a range of themes from a belief in spiritualism and reincarnation to advocacy of holistic approaches to health and ecology.
2. Of, relating to, or resembling New Age music.
n.
A style of modern music characterized by a relaxing or dreamy texture derived from quiet harmonies and drones, often incorporating synthesizers and acoustic and ethnic instrumentation.

New Ager n.
New′-Ag′ey (-ā′jē) adj.
Translations

New Ager

n (inf)Newagejünger(in) m(f), → New-Age-Jünger(in) m(f)
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References in periodicals archive ?
One could attach to George the mundane label of astrologer or seer or New Ager, yet he was not mundane.
Bitter, unhappy Delilah; her distant mom; and new ager Aunt Rachel begin to deal with grief, emotional distances, and old mysteries that threaten to tear apart the fragile balance they struggle to maintain.
Who are New Agers? The New Ager as a conflictual actor
New Ager Sparrow has begun dating a man, and the other characters--all around Bechdel's age--feel out of step with the new generation of "postgays."
A New Ager in Tampa, Florida, claims to channel an entity named Olah, who is supposed to be a reincarnation of both Edgar Cayce and the revered Lakota spiritual entity White Buffalo Calf Woman.
When Cheryl and Andy take their dog to a canine shrink (Mark McKinney, who along with Harland Williams as a freaky New Ager, practically walks away with the film), they turn it into a session about their own problems and past history.
How does one become a New Ager? Is it through the process of conversion?
At his 80th birthday party, he asks his heirs to sign documents giving his third wife, Marcia (Hiam Abbass), more power on the company's board of directors than that of Kendall or the other three Roy siblings: Connor (Alan Ruck), a disengaged New Ager; Roman (Kieran Culkin), an unaccomplished jackwagon; and Siobhan (Sarah Snook), a political operative who works for candidates on the left, mostly to irritate her father and make good on her family nickname -- Shiv.
In the final monologue, from Scott Greer (especially good at slick, over-articulate intellectuals), a man describes a woman he picks up at an outdoor concert, a post-hippie New Ager. After the inevitable seduction, and after they have "exchanged the requisite horizontal reassurances," he is dismayed to discover he has fallen in love with what had been "classified as a strictly one-night objective." This is clearly not a date show.
Yet there's nothing in Bartolini's work of the uncritical enthusiasm of the neophyte or the banal syncretism of the New Ager. Instead, there is a deliberate loss of self, for instance, in contemplation of a fragment of an Indian temple, in a shadow that stands out among the columns or has perhaps been generated by a projecting capital.
(In Wuthnow's terms, even the convert to fundamentalism often is taking a seeking approach that makes for a relatively superficial embrace of religious dogma.) Additionally, while it is interesting to consider that the conservative Christian and liberal New Ager can share an essential approach to spirituality, what happens if and when a deeply felt practice orientation leads these individuals t oward commitment to two different socio-political agendas?