New Deal


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New Deal

n.
1. The set of programs and policies designed to promote economic recovery and social reform introduced during the 1930s by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
2. The period during which these programs and policies were developed.

New Dealer n.

New Deal

n
1. (Historical Terms) the domestic policies of Franklin D. Roosevelt for economic and social reform
2. (Historical Terms) the period of the implementation of these policies (1933–40)
New Dealer n

New′ Deal′


n.
1. the economic and social policies and programs introduced by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his administration.
2. the Roosevelt administration, esp.the period from 1933 to 1941.
[1932]
New′ Deal′er, n.

New Deal

Roosevelt’s 1932 pledge for the people while accepting the Democratic presidential nomination; also the legislative program of his administration.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.New Deal - the economic policy of F. D. RooseveltNew Deal - the economic policy of F. D. Roosevelt
economic policy - a government policy for maintaining economic growth and tax revenues
2.New Deal - the historic period (1933-1940) in the United States during which President Franklin Roosevelt's economic policies were implemented
3.new deal - a reapportioning of something
deal - the act of apportioning or distributing something; "the captain was entrusted with the deal of provisions"
Translations
new deal
References in classic literature ?
It seemed to me that what the nine hundred and ninety-four dupes needed was a new deal.
While Wallace conveys the "range, sophistication and efficiency" of the New Deal programs, his technocrat's language and win/win Keynesianism seem unlikely to inspire the dramatic reshaping of the economy that he envisions.
Recruitment firm Manpower hopes to find the posts through an innovative New Deal scheme.
Scholars intellectually and emotionally committed to the New Deal and the welfare state fashioned this prevailing account of triumphant New Deal constitutionalism, and they disparaged the justices who in the 1930s resisted fundamental changes in constitutional thinking.
The new deal has thee major components: a $475 million seven-year revolving credit; a $100 million seven-year term loan; and an eight-year $425 million term loan.
Designing a New America: The Origins of New Deal Planning, 1890-1943.
2) Among recent theorists of constitutional change, Bruce Ackerman deserves great credit for highlighting the importance of this issue and stressing the need to consider the relationships among all the branches of government during three great constitutional moments: Founding, Reconstruction, and the New Deal.
Their sudden switch during Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal seems odd: New Deal agencies helped drive black sharecroppers off their land, and Roosevelt refused to support federal anti-lynching bills and efforts to restore black voting rights.
Leuchtenburg, the distinguished American historian of the New Deal, was at first doubtful that there were enough of his lesser known essays to be collected for a book.
These burgeoning inequalities are one consequence of the retreat from traditional New Deal liberalism, she says.
A new deal needs to be defined - and with it a new relationship based on shared interests and partnership, not dependency.
Roosevelt and the New Deal has ruled the roost of one-volume analyses of that exciting, consequential era.