New English Bible


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New English Bible

n. Abbr. NEB
A modern translation of the Bible prepared by a British interdenominational team and published in 1970.

New English Bible

n
(Bible) a new Modern English version of the Bible and Apocrypha, published in full in 1970

New′ Eng′lish Bi′ble


n.
a British translation (1970) of the Bible into contemporary idiom, directed by Protestant churches.
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Noun1.New English Bible - a modern English version of the Bible and Apocrypha
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First, many Baptists did not want a new English Bible version, content to remain with the KJV, despite its flaws.
The first verse tells the reader that, "there was a man named Lazarus who had fallen ill" (Oxford New English Bible, John 11.
Thus, in bemoaning the loss of "Religious English" in translations like The Good News Bible, The New English Bible, The Contemporary English Version, and The New International Version, and in staunchly defending The King James Version, as well as The Book of Common Prayer, Robinson simultaneously demonstrates courage of judgment and courage of faith.
Phillips, The Gospels in Modern English (1952); the Revised Standard Version (1952); The Living Bible (1962-82); The New English Bible (1970); Today's English Version (also Good News Bible, 1976); and the New International Version (1978).
The New English Bible, accepted by both Protestant and Catholic churches in Great Britain, uses "slave" and "slave-girl" in its translation.
It comes out here, apropos the disastrousness of the New English Bible 1962), which T.
During the brief reign of Queen Mary, English exiles there produced a new English Bible, based in part on the Great Bible for the Old Testament and Tyndale for the New.
Would you like the King James Version, the New King James Version, the Revised Standard Version, the New Revised Standard Version, the New International Version, the New English Bible, the Revised English Bible, Today's English Version or the Contemporary English Version, the American Standard Version, the New American Standard Bible, the Jerusalem Bible, the Living Bible or .
It was not until the 1960s that a New English Bible was introduced, making room for contemporary idiom and the evidence of more ancient Greek manuscripts (though there had been various revisions, called "Revised Standard Versions," from Victorian times onward, to bring up to date Tudor locutions that had changed their meaning in spoken English: "prevent," for instance, meant to precede or to anticipate; and "let" meant its opposite, to hinder).

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