New Hebrides


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New Hebrides

New Hebrides

pl n
(Placename) the former name (until 1980) of Vanuatu

Va•nu•a•tu

(ˌvɑ nuˈɑ tu)

n.
a republic consisting of a group of islands in the SW Pacific, W of Fiji: formerly under joint British and French administration; gained independence in 1980. 189,036; ab. 4707 sq. mi. (12,190 sq. km). Cap.: Vila. Formerly, New Hebrides.
Va`nu•a′tu•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.New Hebrides - a volcanic island republic in MelanesiaNew Hebrides - a volcanic island republic in Melanesia; independent since 1980
Melanesia - the islands in the southwestern part of Oceania
capital of Vanuatu, Port Vila, Vila - capital of Vanuatu
References in classic literature ?
On the 25th of December the Nautilus sailed into the midst of the New Hebrides, discovered by Quiros in 1606, and that Bougainville explored in 1768, and to which Cook gave its present name in 1773.
Patrick, passed close to Tikopia, one of the New Hebrides.
All through the New Hebrides and the Solomons and up among the atolls on the Line, during this period under a tropic sun, rotten with malaria, and suffering from a few minor afflictions such as Biblical leprosy with the silvery skin, I did the work of five men.
I remember one, a calcined Scotchman from the New Hebrides.
We blackbirded from the New Hebrides and the Line Islands over to the westward clear through the Louisades, New Britain, New Ireland, and New Hanover.
The belief that Philip, also known as the Duke of Edinburgh, was indeed the travelling son was reinforced in 1974 when he and the Queen made an official visit to the New Hebrides.
He joined the colonial service at its last gasp in the New Hebrides and was killed there when a camping stove exploded.
Also included in the work are stories of a Blyth man who built a boat and discovered the New Hebrides, a local potter who built a full size prehistoric animal and life-size kings and queens for two black and white silent films in Hollywood, and the Cambois miner who captured his experiences as a gunner in the First World War in pencil in a small pocket diary later discovered by his grandson.
Dengue in US service members during World War II * Attack Location Dates rate, % North Territory and 1942 Mar-May 80 Queensland, Australia 1943 Jan-Mar ND Rockhampton/Brisbane, Australia Espiritu Santo, archipelago 1943 Feb-Aug 25 of New Hebrides (now Vanuatu) New Caledonia 1943 Jan-Aug ND 1943 Jan-Aug ND Hawaii 1943 ND Gilbert Islands 1944 ND New Guinea 1944 Jan-Dec ND 1945 Jan-Aug ND Philippines ([dagger]) 1944 Nov-Dec ND 1945 Jan-Dec ND Saipan, Mariana Islands 1944 Jul-Sep ND China-Burma-India 1943 ND 1944 ND 1945 ND Okinawa, Japan 1945 Apr-Aug ND Hankow, China 1945 Sep 83 Maximum no.
However, retaliation to illegal recruiting was often considerable, and the murder of Bishop John Patteson in the New Hebrides was one measure of the strength of local opposition to blackbirding and perceptions of the overly coercive role of Europeans.
Willemse (1926) described three females and a nymph collected in New Hebrides, Espir.
In 1774, Captain Cook named the islands the New Hebrides, a name that lasted until independence.