New Left


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New Left

n.
A political movement originating in the United States in the 1960s, especially among college students, marked by advocacy of radical changes in government, politics, and society.

New Leftist n.

New Left

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a loose grouping of left-wing radicals, esp among students, that arose in many countries after 1960

New′ Left′


n.
a political movement of the 1960s and 1970s that sought radical changes in the political, social, and economic system.
[1960]
New′ Left′ist, n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the dispersal of the New Left, see Boraman, The New Left in New Zealand from 1956 to the early 1980s, pp.
Among the stages are political awakenings at Cornell University in 1959, freedom rides in May 1961, disillusionment of the New Left in 1968, experimental education in Buffalo in 1969, hitching out west in 1974, and illusions and hope in 1996.
ALMOST COMPLETELY ignored in the excitement over Barack Obama has been the collapse of the New Left revival that peaked between the Nader campaign of 2000 and the Dean campaign of 2003.
Anderson was an early editor of New Left Review and today is a professor of history and sociology at UCLA.
1) A reasonably dense historiography has also begun retrieving the intellectual genealogies of the movements concerned, as for instance in the extensive literature on the contexts of the British New Left from the mid-1950s.
IN 1974, LANNY DAVIS--WI-IO WOULD ONE day be a White House special counsel in the Clinton administration, but at the time was a young New Left Democratic activist--wrote a book entitled The Emerging Democratic Majority.
Tariq Ali, an editor of New Left Review, stopped by our office on April 23 while on tour for his latest book, The Clash of Fundamentalisms (Verso), which I highly recommend, by the way.
The new left government will have to strike an informal alliance--if not an outright coalition-- with one of the right-wing parties to form a majority.
Heineman's portraits become caricatures and cartoons of the pharmaceutical and sexual life of the New Left, the counterculture, and the civil rights movement: The Free Speech Movement was the occasion "for the consumption of narcotics and for vigorous sexual experimentation.
The prime note sounded in this collection of post-mortem essays is one of frustration, and rather schoolmarmishly, these twenty-one pieces from the heart of the British New Left (plus a couple meters of verse by Jean Baudrillard) present themselves as a stern corrective to, in the words of philosopher Glen Newey, "1oopy fanzine drool and schoolgirl crush-gush": a brainy kick to the gut of the New Sincerity.
Despite the group's small size, Tracy demonstrates how its tactics and ideology made a lasting impact not only on the American peace movement, but also on the New Left and the struggle for racial equality.
Howe rejected the New Left cults of youth and expressive violence in the '60s, the cults of Castro and Ho Chi Minh and Mao" (Dionne).