New Zealand flax


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(Bot.) See Flax-plant.
(Bot.) A tall, liliaceous herb (Phormium tenax), having very long, sword-shaped, distichous leaves which furnish a fine, strong fiber very valuable for cordage and the like.
The fiber itself.

See also: Flax, New Zealand, New Zealand

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The project involved removing existing patches of grass and dying rose bushes, leveling the soil, putting down weed control, and planting drought tolerant plants, New Zealand flax and bird of paradise.
If you fancy something a bit more architectural, try Phormium the New Zealand flax with its broad, swordlike leaves.
Phormiums, or New Zealand Flax as it is commonly known, throws up these great long flowering shoots - you don't need to cut them down but you can if you wish, to tidy the appearance of the shrub.
Phormiums, or New Zealand Flax as it is commonly know, throws up these great long flowering shoots - you don't need to cut them down but you can if you wish, to tidy the appearance of the shrub.
NEW Zealand flax or Phormiums make a statement in the garden and look at home in a variety of different planting schemes.
In addition, skin care manufacturers are said to be exploring such exotic ingredients as harakeke, also known as New Zealand flax, a plant that is loaded with antioxidant and hydrating abilities and has already found its way into a few high-end body lotions, and quince seed extract, a substance that promotes wound healing and skin repair.
Kete are usually made from the leaves of New Zealand flax.
QMy New Zealand flax has gone brown and I can pull some of the leaves out the middle.
For really big pots, try RHODODENDRONS and AZALEAS, CORDYLINES, YUCCA, ACERS, UMBRELLA BAMBOO and NEW ZEALAND FLAX.
New Zealand Flax (Phormium) These col ourful plants with sword- shaped leaves in a variety of colours -from yellows and creams to reds and pinks -go well against the palms.
New Zealand flax, introduced in 1874, played an important role in the island's economy, and the museum houses a section showing the development of this industry which flourished, particularly during the early 1950s, when St Helena hemp was exported to the UK for use in tying the mail bags of the British Post Office.

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