neologism

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ne·ol·o·gism

 (nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm, nē′ō-lō′-)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. The creation or use of new words or senses.
3. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.
4. Theology A new doctrine or a new interpretation of scripture.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.
Usage Note: The traditional pronunciation of neologism is accented on the second syllable (nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm). In our 2015 survey, this is the pronunciation preferred by 72 percent of the Usage Panel. A newer variant pronunciation accented on the third syllable (nē′ō-lō′jĭz′əm) is preferred by 28 percent of the Panel; however, only half of the Panel finds it acceptable.

neologism

(nɪˈɒləˌdʒɪzəm) or

neology

n, pl -gisms or -gies
1. (Linguistics) a newly coined word, or a phrase or familiar word used in a new sense
2. (Linguistics) the practice of using or introducing neologisms
3. rare a tendency towards adopting new views, esp rationalist views, in matters of religion
[C18: via French from neo- + -logism, from Greek logos word, saying]
neˈologist n
neˌoloˈgistic, neˌoloˈgistical, neological adj
neˌoloˈgistically, ˌneoˈlogically adv

ne•ol•o•gism

(niˈɒl əˌdʒɪz əm)

n.
1. a new word or phrase or an existing word used in a new sense.
2. the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words.
3. a word invented and understood only by the speaker, occurring most often in the speech of schizophrenics.
[1790–1800; < French néologisme]
ne•ol′o•gist, n.
ne•ol`o•gis′tic, adj.
ne•ol′o•gize`, v.i. -gized, -giz•ing.

neologism, neology

1. a new word, usage, or phrase.
2. the coining or introduction of new words or new senses for established words. See also theology. — neologian, neologist, n. — neologistic, neologistical, adj.
See also: Language
neology.
See also: Theology

neologism

1. A word or expression that is newly created.
2. A newly coined word or expression.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neologism - a newly invented word or phrase
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
portmanteau, portmanteau word, blend - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
2.neologism - the act of inventing a word or phrase
invention - the act of inventing

neologism

noun new word, buzz word (informal), coinage, new phrase, vogue word, nonce word The newspaper used the neologism 'dinks', Double Income No Kids
Translations
novotvar
NeologismusWortneuschöpfung
uudismuodoste
neologizamnovotvorenica
neologizmusszóújítás
neologismus

neologism

[nɪˈɒlədʒɪzəm] Nneologismo m

neologism

[niˈɒlədʒɪzəm] nnéologisme m

neologism

n (Ling) → (Wort)neubildung f, → Neologismus m

neologism

[nɪˈɒləˌdʒɪzəm] nneologismo

ne·ol·o·gism

n. neologismo.
1. vocablos a los cuales el paciente mental atribuye nuevos significados no relacionados con el verdadero;
2. vocablo al cual se le atribuye un giro nuevo.
References in classic literature ?
It's a new word in history, that little document, news of which Mr.
It has grown with the growth of the planet's learning and scientific achievements, but so ingenious a thing it is that new words to express new thoughts or describe new conditions or discoveries form themselves--no other word could explain the thing that a new word is required for other than the word that naturally falls to it, and so, no matter how far removed two nations or races, their spoken languages are identical.
There are very few women's lives that are not--tremulous," Tess replied, pausing over the new word as if it impressed her.
She was, as she said, suffering from la grippe; grippe being then a new word in St.
She is discussed by her dear friends with all the genteelest slang in vogue, with the last new word, the last new manner, the last new drawl, and the perfection of polite indifference.
Well--the general air, the style, the self-possession, the-- the--illusion--you know", laughed Laurie, breaking down and helping himself out of his quandary with the new word.
memory is preserved for generations, or until the new word utterly
Thus More gave a new word to our language, and when we think some idea beautiful but impossible we call it "Utopian.
Taking a new step, uttering a new word is what they fear most.
Dolly was much puzzled at this new word, but she was rather afraid of inquiring further, lest "chapel" might mean some haunt of wickedness.
They find new words, soon will their spirits breathe wantonness.
It is true that the original of this story is put into new words, and the style of the famous lady we here speak of is a little altered; particularly she is made to tell her own tale in modester words that she told it at first, the copy which came first to hand having been written in language more like one still in Newgate than one grown penitent and humble, as she afterwards pretends to be.