Newark


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New·ark

 (no͞o′ərk, nyo͞o′-)
1. A city of northeast New Jersey on Newark Bay, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, opposite Jersey City and west of New York City. It was settled by Puritans in 1666 and is today a heavily industrialized port of entry.
2. A city of central Ohio east of Columbus. It was founded in 1802 on the site of ancient earthworks erected by the Hopewell between about 100 bc and ad 400.

Newark

(ˈnjuːək)
n
1. (Placename) a town in N central England, in Nottinghamshire. Pop: 35 454 (2001). Official name: Newark-on-Trent
2. (Placename) a port in NE New Jersey, just west of New York City, on Newark Bay and the Passaic River: the largest city in the state; founded in 1666 by Puritans from Connecticut; industrial and commercial centre. Pop: 277 911 (2003 est)

New•ark

(ˈnu ərk, ˈnyu-)

n.
a city in NE New Jersey. 268,510.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Newark - the largest city in New JerseyNewark - the largest city in New Jersey; located in northeastern New Jersey
Garden State, Jersey, New Jersey, NJ - a Mid-Atlantic state on the Atlantic; one of the original 13 colonies
References in classic literature ?
On the conclusion of the Nottingham engagement (the results of which more than equaled the results at Derby), I proposed taking the entertainment next -- now we had got it into our own hands -- to Newark. Miss Vanstone raised no objection until we came to the question of time, when she amazed me by stipulating for a week's delay before we appeared in public again.
Financial Statement | Third Week in January Place Visited, | Perform ances, Newark
"I go to Grantham," said the Corn Engrosser, "but I shall lodge tonight at Newark, if I can get so far upon my way."
"Why, I myself am on the way to Newark," quoth merry Robin, "so that, as two honest men are better than one in roads beset by such a fellow as this Robin Hood, I will jog along with thee, if thou hast no dislike to my company."
"Then forward," quoth Robin, "for the day wanes and it will be dark ere we reach Newark." So off they went, the lean horse hobbling along as before, and Robin running beside, albeit he was so quaking with laughter within him that he could hardly stand; yet he dared not laugh aloud, lest the Corn Engrosser should suspect something.
Let us forward, and save thy mirth till we are safe and sound at Newark."
Then merry Robin laughed again, and quoth he, "Men hereabouts call me Robin Hood; so, sweet friend, thou hadst best do my bidding and give me thy shoes, wherefore hasten, I prythee, or else thou wilt not get to fair Newark Town till after dark."
But at Newark Castle, the seat of the Duchess of Buccleuch, he receives kindly entertainment.
had just surrendered to the parliamentary troops, whilst Oxford and Newark still held out for him in the hopes of coming to some arrangement.
They were little more than a stage out of Grantham, or about halfway between it and Newark, when Nicholas, who had been asleep for a short time, was suddenly roused by a violent jerk which nearly threw him from his seat.
In the letter, James thanked "the 10,000 loving and caring Newark citizens who signed my petition of nomination." He described how .much better the city is from when he found it and offered a report card.
28, 29: New York chapter, Introduction to polymer chemistry class, Hilton Newark Airport, Newark, NJ.