Newman


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New·man

 (no͞o′mən, nyo͞o′-), Alfred 1900-1970.
American composer of more than 200 film scores, including Academy Award-winning adaptations of the musicals The King and I (1956) and Camelot (1967).

New·man

 (no͞o′mən, nyo͞o′-), John Henry 1801-1890.
British prelate and theologian. A founder of the Oxford Movement, he converted to Roman Catholicism (1845) and was made a cardinal (1879).

Newman

, Paul Leonard 1925-2008.
American actor and director who starred in such films as Cool Hand Luke (1967), The Sting (1973), and The Color of Money (1986), for which he won an Academy Award.

Newman

(ˈnjuːmən)
n
1. (Biography) Barnet. 1905–70, US painter, a founder of Abstract Expressionism: his paintings include the series Stations of the Cross (1965–66)
2. (Biography) John Henry. 1801–90, British theologian and writer. Originally an Anglican minister, he was a prominent figure in the Oxford Movement. He became a Roman Catholic (1845) and a priest (1847) and was made a cardinal (1879). His writings include the spiritual autobiography Apologia pro vita sua (1864), a treatise on the nature of belief, The Grammar of Assent (1870), and hymns
3. (Biography) Paul. 1925–2008, US film actor and director, who appeared in such films as Hud (1963), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), The Sting (1973), The Verdict (1982), The Color of Money (1986), Nobody's Fool (1994), and Road to Perdition (2002)

New•man

(ˈnu mən, ˈnyu-)

n.
John Henry, Cardinal, 1801–90, English theologian and author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Newman - United States film actor (born in 1925)
2.Newman - English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movementNewman - English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movement; Newman later turned to Roman Catholicism and became a cardinal (1801-1890)
Translations
Novak
Nyman
NeumannNaumann
Nýman
Neander
Nijman, Nyman
Nyman
Novak
Nyman
References in classic literature ?
But no crying, or talking, or hoping, or fearing, could keep off the dreaded Saturday afternoon, or Newman Noggs either; who, punctual to his time, limped up to the door, and breathed a whiff of cordial gin through the keyhole, exactly as such of the church clocks in the neighbourhood as agreed among themselves about the time, struck five.
From Mr Ralph Nickleby,' said Newman, announcing his errand, when he got upstairs, with all possible brevity.
They wouldn't be, if some people had their way,' muttered Newman.
It was no very easy matter to mistake Newman Noggs, after having once seen him, and as Kate, attracted by the singularity of his manner (in which on this occasion, however, there was something respectful and even delicate, notwithstanding the abruptness of his speech), looked at him more closely, she recollected having caught a passing glimpse of that strange figure before.
that is to say the coach, not the turban) went away again, with the two ladies and their luggage inside; and Newman, despite all Mrs Nickleby's assurances that it would be his death--on the box beside the driver.
The door of this deserted mansion Newman opened with a key which he took out of his hat--in which, by-the-bye, in consequence of the dilapidated state of his pockets, he deposited everything, and would most likely have carried his money if he had had any--and the coach being discharged, he led the way into the interior of the mansion.
He performed this ceremony on the following day, when, by appointment, Christopher Newman went to dine with him.
Newman was willing to be taxed for this purpose, largely, in proportion to his means.
Newman accepted every proposal, shook hands universally and promiscuously, and seemed equally unfamiliar with trepidation or with elation.
Christopher Newman dined several times in the Avenue d'Iena, and his host always proposed an early adjournment to this institution.
Tristram had a balcony before her windows, upon which, during the June evenings, she was fond of sitting, and Newman used frankly to say that he preferred the balcony to the club.
Well, I suppose I am happy," said Newman, meditatively.