Newton's law of gravitation


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Newton's law of gravitation

n.
The law proposed by Sir Isaac Newton that expresses the force of gravitational attraction between two bodies as a function of their masses and their distance. Expressed mathematically, F = Gm1m2/d2 where F is the force in Newtons, m1 and m2 are the masses of the bodies in kilograms, G is the gravitational constant, and d is the distance between the bodies in meters.

[After Isaac Newton.]

Newton's law of gravitation

n
(General Physics) the principle that two particles attract each other with forces directly proportional to the product of their masses divided by the square of the distance between them

Newton's law of gravitation

The principle that two bodies exert a gravitational attraction for each other that increases as their masses increase and as the distance between them decreases. In mathematical terms, the force equals the product of the two masses multiplied by the gravitational constant and divided by the square of the distance. Also called law of gravitation, law of universal gravitation. See Note at gravity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Newton's law of gravitation - (physics) the law that states any two bodies attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
gravitational theory, Newton's theory of gravitation, theory of gravitation, theory of gravity - (physics) the theory that any two particles of matter attract one another with a force directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
constant of gravitation, gravitational constant, universal gravitational constant, G - (physics) the universal constant relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitation
References in periodicals archive ?
The required use of G in Sir Isaac Newton's Law of Gravitation, F=Gm1m2/r^2, factors in something other than the two mass or the equation would read F=m1m2/r^2.
Current models and simulations of the universe are built on Newton's law of gravitation, using codes that do not incorporate the movement of space itself.
Only later in a second phase of development do students connect this with Newton's law of gravitation itself and explore other consequences of that law, such as the orbital motions of satellites.
For example, in physics, Newton's law of gravitation tells us how a particle moves under the action of gravity.