gravitational force

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gravitational force

n.
The weakest of the four fundamental forces of nature, being the attractive force that arises from gravitational interaction. Newton's law of gravity states that the gravitational force between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gravitational force - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universegravitational force - (physics) the force of attraction between all masses in the universe; especially the attraction of the earth's mass for bodies near its surface; "the more remote the body the less the gravity"; "the gravitation between two bodies is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them"; "gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love"--Albert Einstein
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
solar gravity - the gravity of the sun; "solar gravity creates extreme pressures and temperatures"
References in periodicals archive ?
They had not, however, yet formally encountered Newton's law of universal gravitation.
It unifies Special Relativity and Sir Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation with the insight that gravitation is not due to a force but rather a manifestation of curved space and time, with the curvature being produced by the mass-energy and momentum content of the space time.