nexus

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nex·us

 (nĕk′səs)
n. pl. nexus or nex·us·es
1. A means of connection; a link or tie: "this nexus between New York's ... real-estate investors and its ... politicians" (Wall Street Journal).
2. A connected series or group.
3. The core or center: "The real nexus of the money culture [was] Wall Street" (Bill Barol).

[Latin, from past participle of nectere, to bind; see ned- in Indo-European roots.]

nexus

(ˈnɛksəs)
n, pl nexus
1. a means of connection between members of a group or things in a series; link; bond
2. a connected group or series
[C17: from Latin: a binding together, from nectere to bind]

nex•us

(ˈnɛk səs)

n., pl. nex•us•es, nex•us.
1. a means of connection; tie; link.
2. a connected series or group.
3. the core or center, as of a matter or situation.
4. a specialized area of the cell membrane involved in intercellular communication and adhesion.
[1655–65; < Latin nexus a binding, joining, fastening, derivative of nect(ere) to bind, fasten]

Nexus

 a connected group or series, 1850.
Example: nexus of matrimonial excesses.—BBC, 23 April 1983.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nexus - the means of connection between things linked in seriesnexus - the means of connection between things linked in series
linkage - an associative relation
2.nexus - a connected series or group
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"

nexus

noun connection, link, tie, bond, junction, joining The nexus between drugs, prostitution and corruption is universal.

nexus

noun
That which unites or binds:
Translations
central

nexus

[ˈneksəs] Nnexo m

nexus

nVerknüpfung f, → Verkettung f

nex·us

n. nexo, conexión, unión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neoclassical economic theorists, influenced by the earlier work of Adolph Berle but adapted to their interests, posited that the firm was a legal fiction that was no more than a "nexus of contracts," and it was the shareholders, or principals, that had a legitimate claim on the firm's net profits.
THE VULNERABILITIES OF THE "NEXUS OF CONTRACTS" PARADIGM
* Kenneth Ayotte, Northwestern University, and Henry Hansmann, Yale University, "A Nexus of Contracts Theory of Legal Entities"
(2) The nexus of contracts theory is meant to point up the voluntary, market-oriented nature of the firm and to dismiss the notion that the corporation owes anything to the state.
In the early 1980s, the intuitive mistrust of government that underlies so many aspects of American life (2) was given an explicit theoretical foundation in the form of the so-called 'nexus of contracts' theory of the corporation.
Second, there is the 'nexus of contracts' view of the company, which understands the company as simply a legal entity for contracting.