Nicaragua


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Related to Nicaragua: Costa Rica, Nicaragua Canal
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Nicaragua

Nic·a·ra·gua

 (nĭk′ə-rä′gwə)
A country of Central America on the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. Various Indian peoples, including the Miskito, inhabited the area when Columbus visited in 1502. Spanish settlement began in 1524. The colony was ruled as part of Guatemala until 1821, when the entire region gained independence. Since its designation as a republic in 1838, Nicaragua has had a turbulent history, with frequent intervention by foreign powers. Managua is the capital and the largest city.

Ni′ca·ra′guan adj. & n.

Nicaragua

(ˌnɪkəˈræɡjʊə; -ɡwə; Spanish nikaˈraɣwa)
n
1. (Placename) a republic in Central America, on the Caribbean and the Pacific: colonized by the Spanish from the 1520s; gained independence in 1821 and was annexed by Mexico, becoming a republic in 1838. Official language: Spanish. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: córdoba. Capital: Managua. Pop: 5 788 531 (2013 est). Area: 131 812 sq km (50 893 sq miles)
2. (Placename) Lake Nicaragua a lake in SW Nicaragua, separated from the Pacific by an isthmus 19 km (12 miles) wide: the largest lake in Central America. Area: 8264 sq km (3191 sq miles)

Nic•a•ra•gua

(ˌnɪk əˈrɑ gwə)

n.
1. a republic in Central America. 4,717,132; 50,193 sq. mi. (130,000 sq. km). Cap.: Managua.
2. Lake, a lake in SW Nicaragua. 92 mi. (148 km) long; 34 mi. (55 km) wide; 3060 sq. mi. (7925 sq. km).
Nic`a•ra′guan, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nicaragua - a republic in Central AmericaNicaragua - a republic in Central America; achieved independence from Spain in 1821
Central America - the isthmus joining North America and South America; extends from the southern border of Mexico to the northern border of Colombia
capital of Nicaragua, Managua, Nicaraguan capital - the capital and largest city of Nicaragua
Nicaraguan - a native or inhabitant of Nicaragua
Translations
Nikaragua
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
Nikaragva
Nicaragua
ニカラグア
니카라과
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
ประเทศนิคารากัว
nước Nicaragua

Nicaragua

[ˌnɪkəˈrægjʊə] NNicaragua f

Nicaragua

[ˌnɪkəˈrægjuə] nNicaragua m

Nicaragua

nNicaragua nt

Nicaragua

[ˌnikəˈrægjʊə] nNicaragua m

Nicaragua

نِيكَارَاجُوَا Nikaragua Nicaragua Nicaragua Νικαράγουα Nicaragua Nicaragua Nicaragua Nikaragva Nicaragua ニカラグア 니카라과 Nicaragua Nicaragua Nikaragua Nicarágua Никарагуа Nicaragua ประเทศนิคารากัว Nikaragua nước Nicaragua 尼加拉瓜
References in classic literature ?
At last Friday pitched upon a tree; for I found he knew much better than I what kind of wood was fittest for it; nor can I tell to this day what wood to call the tree we cut down, except that it was very like the tree we call fustic, or between that and the Nicaragua wood, for it was much of the same colour and smell.
The EC expressed particular concern for the rule of law in Nicaragua-obviously key to market development, but as well having impact on the daily lives of Nicaragua's citizens.
While hosting the Iranian leader in Nicaragua, Ortega offered a less inflammatory stance but still pledged close ties with Iran.
In the final days of his presidency, Bolanos signed a bill passed unanimously in the National Assembly, banning abortion in Nicaragua with no exceptions, including the mother's life.
IMF Nicaragua Country Representative Vikram Haksar says, thanks to the trade deal, Nicaragua will have a chance to reach new markets.
But Ortega faces a serious challenge from within the Sandinista Party, and from a most unlikely figure--Herty Lewites, the balding, 66-year-old son of a Jewish candy manufacturer who landed in Nicaragua in the 1920s after fleeing his homeland.
experiment to tear Nicaragua apart in the '80s Was Mr.
The E gene sequence of the 3 Cuban DENV-3 isolates and the single strain from Nicaragua isolated in 1994 were aligned with the E gene sequences (1,479 bp in length) of 60 DENV-3 isolates deposited in GenBank, representing the global genetic diversity of DENV-3.
experienced the long-term forms and processes of transformational learning during and after participation in the international service-learning program in Nicaragua (Author, 2002).
Cocesna was required to upgrade its current network to meet the partial lifting of telecommunication regulations in Nicaragua designed at opening access to frequencies for mobile telephone, paging and satellite communications.
The "Secrets to Success" study, released at a conference in Managua, reveals the following: Most of the winners of the Cup of Excellence 2003 are from the departments of Jinotega (43%) and Nueva Segovia (33%); 92% of the winning farms are at an altitude of at least 1,000 meters (only 21% of Nicaragua's total coffee production is grown at this altitude); All of the winning farms receive between 1,000 and 1,600 millimeters of rain/year; 100% of the winners have access to their own source of clean water, compared to 70% of non-winners; 95% of the winners have de-pulping machines that are in good condition, compared to 50% of non-winners; The winners ferment their coffee for much longer than non-winners.
This myth was elaborated and generalized via the discourse on Nicaragua, and while Gould devotes much of his attention to discourse and the power of language, his examination is rooted in the very real material circumstances of what happened to these communities.