Nicene Creed

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Ni·cene Creed

 (nī′sēn′, nī-sēn′)
n. Christianity
A formal statement of doctrine of the Christian faith adopted at the Council of Nicaea in ad 325 to defend orthodoxy from Arianism and expanded in later councils.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nicene Creed

n
1. (Theology) the formal summary of Christian beliefs promulgated at the first council of Nicaea in 325 ad
2. (Theology) a longer formulation of Christian beliefs authorized at the council of Constantinople in 381, and now used in most Christian liturgies
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ni′cene Creed′


n.
1. a formal statement of the chief tenets of Christian belief, adopted by the first Nicene Council.
2. a later creed of similar form accepted generally throughout Christendom.
[1560–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nicene Creed - (Christianity) a formal creed summarizing Christian beliefs; first adopted in 325 and later expanded
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is where the signing of the Nicean Creed occurred.
As a "good Christian" I too mouthed the theophany of the Nicean Creed that Jesus was "true God and true man"; but this was just a neat formula.
Perhaps Steindl-Rast should have referenced the Nicean Creed, which spells out many of the concepts with which he valiantly struggles.