Nicholas of Cusa


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Related to Nicholas of Cusa: Pico della Mirandola, Marsilio Ficino

Nicholas of Cu·sa

 (kyo͞o′zə, -sə) 1401-1464.
German prelate, scientist, and Neoplatonist philosopher who emphasized the incompleteness of human knowledge of God and nature.

Nicholas of Cusa

(ˈkjuːzə)
n
(Biography) 1401–64, German cardinal, philosopher, and mathematician: anticipated Copernicus in asserting that the earth revolves around the sun
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The specific thinkers he considers are Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Nicholas of Cusa, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Michel Montaigne, Rene Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Henri Poincare, the neopositivists, and Karl Raimund Popper.
shows how Augustine's pessimism about the salvation of people of other religions influenced much of the official teaching of the Catholic Church through the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, despite Thomas Aquinas's writings on "implicit faith" and despite the bold explorations of the salvation of people of other religions by Ramon Llull and Nicholas of Cusa.
I "cultivate my ignorance" about spiritual matters, a lesson I learned from my favorite theologian, Nicholas of Cusa, who said each of us should pursue our own unique form of spiritual ignorance, our own ways of shedding the need to know everything.
After seeking insight from the encounters with Islam of Nicholas of Cusa and Martin Luther, Volf argues, in precise, step-by-step fashion, that Christian and Islamic descriptions of God and God's commands, while by no means identical, are sufficiently similar to allow the affirmation that Christians and Muslims (at least, those who represent their traditions well) do worship the same God.
Yet the critical issue raised by Basel and such luminaries as Giuliano Cesarini and Nicholas of Cusa continues to haunt us: what force does Haec sancta (or its implied principle) have when the Church is not in schism, as at Constance, but honored a single, undoubted pope?
The Spaniard, John of Segovia, who died in 1458 and the German, Nicholas of Cusa, who died in 1464, were particularly influential.
Writings on Church and Reform marks a major advance in scholarship on Nicholas of Cusa (1401-64).
Hudson's monograph promises to tackle the philosophy of Nicholas of Cusa from a unique perspective.
In the history of Christian ecumenism the name of Nicholas of Cusa (1401-64) has a prominent place both for his diplomatic work with the Greek Orthodox community and for his intellectual contributions to interreligious dialogue.
This grab bag of colorful ecclesiastical characters includes John Damascene, Theodore Abu Qurrah (a Melchite bishop in the ninth century who wrote treatises against the Muslims in Arabic), Peter the Venerable, Raymond Martini, Raymond Lull, Ricoldus de Monte Croce, Dionysius the Carthusian, Cardinal Juan Torquemada, Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa, and even the Florentine reformer Savonarola (of "bonfire of the vanities" fame).
Out goes the house-like image of the medieval cosmos, and Harries highlights the influential philosophical realignments framed by the Renaissance scholar Nicholas of Cusa, alongside the exploration of perspective by his contemporary Leon Battista Alberti, a philosophical and practical construct that located man at the centre of the universe.
The Analogical Turn: Rethinking Modernity With Nicholas of Cusa