Nietzsche

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Nie·tzsche

 (nē′chə, -chē), Friedrich Wilhelm 1844-1900.
German philosopher who argued that Christianity's emphasis on the afterlife makes its believers less able to cope with earthly life. He suggested that the ideal human, the Übermensch, would be able to channel passions creatively instead of suppressing them. His written works include Beyond Good and Evil (1886) and Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-1892).

Nie′tzsche·an adj. & n.

Nietzsche

(ˈniːtʃə)
n
(Biography) Friedrich Wilhelm (ˈfriːdrɪç ˈvɪlhɛlm). 1844–1900, German philosopher, poet, and critic, noted esp for his concept of the superman and his rejection of traditional Christian values. His chief works are The Birth of Tragedy (1872), Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883–91), and Beyond Good and Evil (1886)
Nietzschean n, adj
ˈNietzscheˌism, ˈNietzscheanˌism n

Nie•tzsche

(ˈni tʃə, -tʃi)
n.
Friedrich Wilhelm, 1844–1900, German philosopher.
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Noun1.Nietzsche - influential German philosopher remembered for his concept of the superman and for his rejection of Christian valuesNietzsche - influential German philosopher remembered for his concept of the superman and for his rejection of Christian values; considered, along with Kierkegaard, to be a founder of existentialism (1844-1900)