nightshade

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night·shade

 (nīt′shād′)
n.
A plant of the nightshade family, especially a poisonous one of the genus Solanum or Atropa, such as bittersweet nightshade or belladonna.

[Middle English, from Old English nihtscada : niht, night; see night + sceadu, shade.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nightshade

(ˈnaɪtˌʃeɪd)
n
1. (Plants) any of various solanaceous plants, such as deadly nightshade, woody nightshade, and black nightshade
2. (Plants) See enchanter's nightshade
[Old English nihtscada, apparently night + shade, referring to the poisonous or soporific qualities of these plants]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

night•shade

(ˈnaɪtˌʃeɪd)

n.
1. any of various plants of the genus Solanum, esp. the black nightshade or the bittersweet.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English nihtscada]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nightshade - any of numerous shrubs or herbs or vines of the genus Solanumnightshade - any of numerous shrubs or herbs or vines of the genus Solanum; most are poisonous though many bear edible fruit
genus Solanum, Solanum - type genus of the Solanaceae: nightshade; potato; eggplant; bittersweet
kangaroo apple, poroporo, Solanum aviculare - Australian annual sometimes cultivated for its racemes of purple flowers and edible yellow egg-shaped fruit
ball nettle, ball nightshade, bull nettle, horse nettle, Solanum carolinense - coarse prickly weed having pale yellow flowers and yellow berrylike fruit; common throughout southern and eastern United States
bittersweet, bittersweet nightshade, climbing nightshade, poisonous nightshade, Solanum dulcamara, woody nightshade, deadly nightshade - poisonous perennial Old World vine having violet flowers and oval coral-red berries; widespread weed in North America
prairie berry, purple nightshade, silverleaf nightshade, silver-leaved nettle, silver-leaved nightshade, Solanum elaeagnifolium, trompillo, white horse nettle - weedy nightshade with silvery foliage and violet or blue or white flowers; roundish berry widely used to curdle milk; central United States to South America
African holly, Solanum giganteum - woolly-stemmed biennial arborescent shrub of tropical Africa and southern Asia having silvery-white prickly branches, clusters of blue or white flowers, and bright red berries resembling holly berries
black nightshade, common nightshade, poisonberry, poison-berry, Solanum nigrum - Eurasian herb naturalized in America having white flowers and poisonous hairy foliage and bearing black berries that are sometimes poisonous but sometimes edible
Jerusalem cherry, Madeira winter cherry, Solanum pseudocapsicum, winter cherry - small South American shrub cultivated as a houseplant for its abundant ornamental but poisonous red or yellow cherry-sized fruit
buffalo bur, Solanum rostratum - North American nightshade with prickly foliage and racemose yellow flowers
ligneous plant, woody plant - a plant having hard lignified tissues or woody parts especially stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lilek
galnebær
NachtschattenTollkirsche
myrkkykoiso
kiauliauogėšunvyšnė
belladonnaurt
pokrzykpsiankawilcza jagoda
belladonna

nightshade

[ˈnaɪtʃeɪd] Ndulcamara f, hierba f mora
deadly nightshadebelladona f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nightshade

[ˈnaɪtʃeɪd] n (also deadly nightshade) → belladone fnight shelter nasile m de nuitnight shift n
(= workers) → équipe f de nuit
(= work) → poste m de nuit
to do the night shift, to be on night shift → être de nuit
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nightshade

nNachtschatten m ? deadly nightshade
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nightshade

[ˈnaɪtˌʃeɪd] n (Bot) deadly nightshadebelladonna
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Would he not suddenly sink into the earth, leaving a barren and blasted spot, where, in due course of time, would be seen deadly nightshade, dogwood, henbane, and whatever else of vegetable wickedness the climate could produce, all flourishing with hideous luxuriance?
"The brooding willow whispered to the yew; Beneath, the deadly nightshade and the rue, With immortelles self-woven into strange Funereal shapes, and horrid nettles grew.
Literature was a fresh garland of spring flowers, he said, in which yew-berries and the purple nightshade mingled with the various tints of the anemone; and somehow or other this garland encircled marble brows.
For the hedgerows in those days shut out one's view, even on the better-managed farms; and this afternoon, the dog-roses were tossing out their pink wreaths, the nightshade was in its yellow and purple glory, the pale honeysuckle grew out of reach, peeping high up out of a holly bush, and over all an ash or a sycamore every now and then threw its shadow across the path.
Overall, the survey included the following crops: tomato, African eggplant, eggplant (aubergine), pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), African nightshades (Solanum americanum Mill.
[2.] Mwai GN, Onyango JC and MO Abukutsa-Onyango Taxonomic Identification and Characterization of African Nightshades (Solanum L.
Most benign and downright tasty among aphrodisiacal nightshades is the "love apple," better known as tomato.
"[Tom] doesn't eat nightshades, because they're not anti-inflammatory.
Each bed will have one of three families: Solanaceae (nightshades), Fabaceae (peas and beans), and a third family.
Comment: Nightshades contain solanine alkaloids, which have been found anecdotally to be a triggering factor for joint pain in some people with osteoarthritis, as well as a cause of various other symptoms in susceptible individuals.
She's on a detox and advises: "Just say no to: alcohol, caffeine, added sugar, gluten, dairy, soy, corn, and nightshades (white, blue, red and yellow potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant)." What's left?
Three of Bahrain's most popular artists - The Nightshades, Gravity and DJ Philip - will also grace the stage.