night soil

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night soil

n.
Human excrement collected for use as fertilizer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

night soil

n
human excrement collected at night from cesspools, privies, etc, and sometimes used as a fertilizer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

night′ soil`


n.
human excrement used as fertilizer.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.night soil - human excreta used as fertilizer
manure - any animal or plant material used to fertilize land especially animal excreta usually with litter material
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
62) channelling water contaminated by 'nightsoil' dumped by residents and waste which 'filled the ditches and piled up around the harbour' (p.
Cersei Lannister smells "sour wine, bread baking, rotting fish and nightsoil, smoke and sweat and horse piss" (A Dance with Dragons [Dance] 991) at the beginning of her walk of contrition; by the end she has trodden in urine, been splattered with blood, rotten vegetables, and the effluvia of decomposing cats, and mobbed by pigs, "hags with goiters as big as their heads," and "a man whose cheeks and brow were covered with open sores that wept grey pus" (994-999).
Interestingly, cleaning of sewers, descending into manholes, removing nightsoil ( human excreta) using a broom find a place in the National Career Services portal that was launched as a part of Centre's Skill India initiative.
Despite some leading figures in the influential British sanitary movement, particularly Sir Edwin Chadwick, arguing that the valuable nutrients in 'nightsoil' should be recycled, by the 1880s the Local Government Board had approved of all coastal towns and cities discharging their sewage directly into the sea.