nigritude


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Related to nigritude: négritude

nigritude

(ˈnɪɡrɪˌtjuːd)
n
rare blackness; darkness
[C17: from Latin nigritūdō, from niger black]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nig•ri•tude

(ˈnɪg rɪˌtud, -ˌtyud, ˈnaɪ grɪ-)

n.
complete darkness or blackness.
[1645–55; < Latin nigritūdō blackness, black color]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

nigritude

the condition of being black; blackness.
See also: Blackening and Blackness, Race
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
President Senghor, perhaps the most influential African intellectual leader to date, created and popularized the concept of nigritude, or blackness, which played an instrumental role in shaping and informing laws on citizenship in Sierra Leone and in neighboring West African states.
She convincingly argues that these writers reinvented elements of African oral culture, not only to contest European literary canons but also to offer an alternative narrative to the heteropatriarchal and masculinist norms that prevailed in the Caribbean identity movements of their times, such as the Harlem Renaissance in the United States, nigritude in the Afro-Caribbean region, and Black nationalism in Jamaica and Trinidad.
(nativism), noirisme (black pride), and nigritude (black pride).
Bonjour et adieu a la nigritude Paris: Editions Robert Laffont, S.A., 1980.
The French Imperial Nation-State: Nigritude and Colonial Humanism between the Two World Wars.
He subsequently established Nigritude and "African socialism" as the cultural, political, and economic ideologies of his government.
Jayne Cortez's jazz poems, dedicated to so many Caribbean writers and artists, engaged with and extended a number of Caribbean literary and artistic movements to the hemisphere, including nigritude in the Francophone Caribbean and negrismo in Cuba.
Additionally, the translator uses the introductory article to bring the not-too-well-debated issue of the long silence on blackness and issues relating to Nigritude in the Dominican Republic into focus and rightfully situates Jimenez's "socio-political poetics," as a "continued voice of the Nigritude aesthetics in the Spanish-speaking world" (14).
Williams (Lanham MD : University Press of America, 2010, paper US$ 59.95); The Changing Face of Afro-Caribbean Cultural Identity: Negrismo and Nigritude, by Mamadou Badiane (Lanham MD: Lexington Books, 2010, cloth US$ 65.00); Activating the Past: History and Memory in the Black Atlantic World, edited by Andrew Apter & Lauren Derby (Newcastle, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars, 2010, cloth US$ 74.99); Gender, Mastery and Slavery: From European to Atlantic World Frontiers, by William Henry Foster (Basingstoke, U.K.: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, paper US$ 28.95); A History of Money and Banking in Barbados, 1627-1973, by Eric Armstrong (Kingston: University of West Indies Press, 2010, paper US$ 25.00); and On the Treatment and Management of the More Common West-India Diseases, 1750-1802, edited by J.
The literary void caused by the lack of female writers who dealt specifically with black themes, as well as black female writers who formed the corpus of the negrista and Nigritude movements, was filled by her mentor and compatriot Nicolas Guillen.
When he is discussing Banjo in the context of Francophone black intellectual circles in the early 1930s, Holcomb is ill-served by his appropriation of the term nigritude. First, whether applied to the 1929 Banjo or employed in confusing phrases about "McKay's black-red-black (that is, negritude anarchist) nomadic wanderings" (p.