nihilism

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ni·hil·ism

 (nī′ə-lĭz′əm, nē′-)
n.
1. Philosophy The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
2. Relentless negativity or cynicism suggesting an absence of values or beliefs: nihilism in postwar art.
3.
a. Political belief or action that advocates or commits violence or terrorism without discernible constructive goals.
b. also Nihilism A diffuse, revolutionary movement of mid-19th-century Russia that scorned authority and tradition and believed in reason, materialism, and radical change in society and government through terrorism and assassination.
4. Psychiatry A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.

[Latin nihil, nothing; see ne in Indo-European roots + -ism.]

ni′hil·ist n.
ni′hil·is′tic adj.
ni′hil·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

nihilism

(ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzəm)
n
1. a complete denial of all established authority and institutions
2. (Philosophy) philosophy an extreme form of scepticism that systematically rejects all values, belief in existence, the possibility of communication, etc
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a revolutionary doctrine of destruction for its own sake
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the practice or promulgation of terrorism
[C19: from Latin nihil nothing + -ism, on the model of German Nihilismus]
ˈnihilist n, adj
ˌnihilˈistic adj

Nihilism

(ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) (in tsarist Russia) any of several revolutionary doctrines that upheld terrorism

ni•hil•ism

(ˈnaɪ əˌlɪz əm, ˈni-)

n.
1. total rejection of established laws and institutions.
2. anarchy, terrorism, or other revolutionary activity.
3.
a. the belief that all existence is senseless and that there is no possibility of an objective basis for truth.
b. nothingness or nonexistence.
4. (cap.) a 19th-century Russian political philosophy advocating the violent destruction of social and political institutions to make way for a new society.
[1810–20; < Latin nihil nothing (variant of nihilum; see nil) + -ism]
ni′hil•ist, n., adj.
ni`hil•is′tic, adj.

nihilism

the belief that existence is not real and that there can be no objective basis of truth, a form of extreme skepticism. Cf. ethical nihilism. — nihilist, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
the principles of a Russian revolutionary movement in the late 19th century, advocating the destruction of government as a means to anarchy and of ten employing terrorism and assassination to assist its program. — nihilist, n., adj.nihilistic, adj.
See also: Government
total rejection of established attitudes, practices, and institutions. — nihilist, n.nihilistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nihilism - a revolutionary doctrine that advocates destruction of the social system for its own sake
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.nihilism - the delusion that things (or everything, including the self) do not exist; a sense that everything is unreal
delusion, psychotic belief - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrary
3.nihilism - complete denial of all established authority and institutions
anarchy, lawlessness - a state of lawlessness and disorder (usually resulting from a failure of government)

nihilism

noun
1. negativity, rejection, denial, scepticism, cynicism, pessimism, renunciation, atheism, repudiation, agnosticism, unbelief, abnegation These disillusioned students embraced agnosticism, atheism, and nihilism.
2. anarchy, disorder, lawlessness This moral nihilism has proved both irresponsible and politically counter-productive.
Translations
nihilizmus
nihilismi
nihilizam

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪlɪzəm] Nnihilismo m

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪlɪzəm] nnihilisme m

nihilism

nNihilismus m

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzm] nnichilismo

ni·hil·ism

n. nihilismo, en psiquiatría una idea ilusoria en la cual nada es real o inexistente.
References in classic literature ?
"No, they are not Nihilists," explained Lebedeff, who seemed much excited.
In the cabin were arms and ammunition, and hidden in a secret receptacle in the cabin table was one of those infernal machines, the construction of which had occupied much of Paulvitch's spare time when he had stood high in the confidence of the Nihilists of his native land.
What is the good of mixing yourself up with these Nihilists? Do give over, little father.
He, like everyone, had heard that there were, especially in Petersburg, progressives of some sort, nihilists and so on, and, like many people, he exaggerated and distorted the significance of those words to an absurd degree.
Father was branded as a nihilist and an anarchist, and in one cartoon that was copied widely he was portrayed waving a red flag at the head of a mob of long-haired, wild-eyed men who bore in their hands torches, knives, and dynamite bombs.
Perhaps the word is misused, and he is better described as a nihilist, or an annihilist.
A Nihilist who rejects all authority, because he knows authority to be evil, and welcomes all pain, because through that he realises his personality, is a real Christian.
In response to the government's critics, Georgiades said "this is how opportunities and job positions are created and this is our response to populists and nihilists."
'Muhammad PBUH who admitted the infidel rights as well hypocrites and nihilists, so we should respect the rights of minorities, these are the rules of Islam and every citizen has basic rights under the constitution' he stressed.
Nihilists finally blow up Maria's father-in-law, Czar Alexander II, and other members of the czar's family.
The people behind this call are the nihilists," he explained.