Varanus niloticus

(redirected from Nile monitor)
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Noun1.Varanus niloticus - destroys crocodile eggsVaranus niloticus - destroys crocodile eggs    
monitor lizard, varan, monitor - any of various large tropical carnivorous lizards of Africa and Asia and Australia; fabled to warn of crocodiles
References in periodicals archive ?
Police were alerted to sightings of a Nile monitor lizard, whose bite is strong enough to crush human bones.
Our pair helps out and distracts the animals - giving a Nile monitor a dental treatment and troubling the water, so the marabous cannot see the swimming babies.
Staff from Emirates Post Group and Dubai Customs are at hand to educate the public on endangered species, including the brown bear, the Hawksbill sea turtle, the elephant, the Nile monitor, the Nile crocodile, the leopard and the spiny-tailed lizard.
A small Nile monitor lizard, not content with waiting by the pipe's other end for morsels of food to appear, had made his way up the length of the pipe, and when he leaped out and virtually grabbed some fish entrails from my hand, "surprise" is probably not the best word to describe my reaction
To battle invasive wildlife species like Nile monitor lizards, Cuban tree frogs, sacred ibis, and numerous species of exotic python, the park needs hundreds of thousands of dollars more.
From the lunge of a hyena warding off the carrion bird that would compete for its kill, to a Nile monitor on the prowl, to dwarf mongooses populating a termite mound den to a close-up of the crowned crane and much more, Endangered Liaisons is a wondrous glimpse of nature's creatures, sometimes even at their more inopportune moments - like a zebra rolling the dust, and even copulating elephants
With their blue tongues, beaded skin, and daggerlike claws, Nile monitor lizards are prized exotic pets.
There's Neil the Nile Monitor lizard, Barry the White Throat Monitor and then there's Brenda the Boa Constrictor.
Groups of Nile monitor lizards--or whatever it is you call a bunch of them--have been sighted in south Charlotte County near Cape Coral living in the decades-old undeveloped canals.
This month's guest speakers were members of the Southwestern Herpetology Society and brought with them the tortoise shell, numerous snakes and, easily the most breathtaking for the children, a 5-foot-5-inch ornate Nile monitor lizard.
The man was found with nine dead lizards and three live ones including a Nile monitor lizard, a water monitor and several geckos from Southeast Asia and Africa.