Nimrud


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Nim·rud

 (nĭm-ro͞od′)
An ancient city of Assyria south of present-day Mosul, Iraq.

Nimrud

(nɪmˈruːd)
n
(Placename) an ancient city in Assyria, near the present-day city of Mosul (Iraq): founded in about 1250 bc and destroyed by the Medes in 612 bc; excavated by Sir Austen Henry Layard
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Evidence of the items on display in the Nergal Gate Museum is provided by the photographic database "Nineveh & Nebi Yunis photos 2008," "Nimrud 2008-10," and "Nimrud Survey Photos Bott Oct 2008," posted on March 7, 2015 to the IraqCrisis Mailing List by Suzanne E.
the world, including the Lewis Chessmen and the Nimrud Ivories,
Many of the items on display originate from archaeological sites in Iraq, including Nineveh and Nimrud, cities recently ravaged by Daesh when the group stormed the ancient sites armed with sledgehammers and drills.
The world watched in horror as video footage emerged of ISIS's destruction of sites in Iraq and Syria, particularly the April 2015 destruction of the ancient Assyrian palace at Nimrud, Iraq, and the October 2015 destruction of the Arch of Triumph and the Temple of Bel at the Roman site of Palmyra, Syria.
The State Department and the Smithsonian announce a new $400,000 project to enable Iraqs State Board of Antiquities and Heritage and others to conduct on-the-ground work to document and stabilize the recently liberated ancient city of Nimrud.
The Ancient Civilizations Forum, established in Athens on April 24, seeks to protect ancient heritage from extremism, particularly in Syria and northern Iraq from the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group, which sabotages and destroys ancient places in Palmyra, Nineveh and Nimrud.
Herrmann tells the story of a few of the magnificent carved ivories that archaeologists have found at Nimrud, where Assyrian kings had collected them from all over the Levant.
During the early first millennium bce (known historically as "The Age of Ivory") literally thousands of carved ivories found their way to the Assyrian capital city of Kalhu, or modern Nimrud, in northern Iraq.
Her book begins with a memory of visiting the historical site of Nimrud as a girl, and a quick mention of the fact that the site's famous winged lions have since been destroyed by the group Daesh, or ISIL.
In March 2015, ISIS fighters destroyed Iraq's ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud. In July 2014, extremists in Mosul destroyed what was believed to be the tomb of Jonah, a key figure in Christianity, Judaism and Islam, among others.
They also ransacked the ancient palace in the Assyrian city of Nimrud south of Mosul.
A fragment of an Assyrian-era relief shows the image of a genie holding a pine cone at the ancient site of Nimrud, destroyed by Islamic State group militants.