Nimrud


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Nim·rud

 (nĭm-ro͞od′)
An ancient city of Assyria south of present-day Mosul, Iraq.

Nimrud

(nɪmˈruːd)
n
(Placename) an ancient city in Assyria, near the present-day city of Mosul (Iraq): founded in about 1250 bc and destroyed by the Medes in 612 bc; excavated by Sir Austen Henry Layard
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Photo courtesy of IRAQ Mission Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) affiliated with International Organization for Migration (IOM) Photo courtesy of IRAQ Mission Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) affiliated with International Organization for Migration (IOM) In February 2017, during a two-day International Coordination Conference on the Safeguarding of Cultural Heritage in Liberated Areas of Iraq at the UNESCO headquarters, Iraq's Vice-Minister of Culture for Antiquities and Tourism Affairs Qais Rasheed said that violent extremists (Da'esh) have wreaked severe damage to archaeological sites of world importance, destroying up to 70 percent of Nineveh and 80 percent of Nimrud.
Meanwhile, Al-Shammari told KUNA that IS has managed to destroy historical evidence of four important historic sites in the province: Nimrud, as capital of the Assyrian empire in the 13th century BC, Nineveh, the capital of Assyrian king Sennacherib and Khorsabad, capital of King Sargon II, both in the seventh century BC, and finally (Al-Hadhar), as the capital of Arab kings in the second century AD.
The State Department and the Smithsonian announce a new $400,000 project to enable Iraqs State Board of Antiquities and Heritage and others to conduct on-the-ground work to document and stabilize the recently liberated ancient city of Nimrud.
During the early first millennium bce (known historically as "The Age of Ivory") literally thousands of carved ivories found their way to the Assyrian capital city of Kalhu, or modern Nimrud, in northern Iraq.
She discusses the city of Nimrud and its discovery, Assyria, the Phoenicians: master craftsmen, Syro-Phoenician ivories, the ivories of North Syria, the influence of regionalism on furniture and the minor arts, and the age of ivory.
Her book begins with a memory of visiting the historical site of Nimrud as a girl, and a quick mention of the fact that the site's famous winged lions have since been destroyed by the group Daesh, or ISIL.
In recent years, many people have had a crash course in ancient Mesopotamia due to the destruction by Daesh of ancient ruins in Palmyra and Nimrud.
In March 2015, ISIS fighters destroyed Iraq's ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud.
They also ransacked the ancient palace in the Assyrian city of Nimrud south of Mosul.
As the tally of eradication mounts--the Temple of Bel in Palmyra, the Northwest Palace of the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud, the Mosque of the Prophet Jonah in Nineveh, the ancient city of Hatra, fourteen of the mausoleums of Timbuktu, all in the past ten years--it has become clear that the devastation is not random but is the result of programmatic cultural cleansing.
builds miniature replicas of statues and figures ISIS fighters destroyed when they overran the city of Nimrud, south of Mosul, more than two years ago.
A fragment of an Assyrian-era relief shows the image of a genie holding a pine cone at the ancient site of Nimrud, destroyed by Islamic State group militants.