Ninevite

Related to Ninevite: Tarshish

Ninevite

(ˈnɪnɪˌvaɪt)
n
(Placename) a native or inhabitant of Nineveh, the ancient capital of Assyria
References in periodicals archive ?
I am more interested in the actions of the sailors and the Ninevite king.
At least it wasn't in the sense of Jonah hearing about Ninevite religion and culture.
When the beast finally "expels" the prophet onto Ninevite soil, Jonah, like a small child, throws a tantrum because the people easily welcome his plea to repent.
Incised ninevite 5 potteries with geometric and naturalistic animal motifs were also unearthed at the site.
This is the Wild Ass of Scripture and the Ninevite sculptures mentioned by Strabo, Eratosthenes, Artemidorus, Homer and Pliny.
Bournonville tells us that Galeotti also clarified the action by other means: 'The pantomime, according to Italian form, consisted of a complete dictionary of accepted gestures that had been gathered from Roman and Neapolitan folkways, and also, to lend greater clarity to the whole, of written placards, tablets, banners, and transparencies which, like the Ninevite flame-writing of old, announced fateful occurrences' (My Theatre Life, p.
As Lewis argued, "A Christian who understands his own religion laughs when unbelievers expect to trouble him by the assertion that Jesus uttered no command which had not been anticipated by the Rabbis--few, indeed, which cannot be paralleled in classical, ancient Egyptian, Ninevite, Babylonian, or Chinese texts.
The intellectual world of the Ninevite court is the subject of several significant papers.
The very end of the fourth millennium and the early third millennium, including the Ninevite 5 period, are documented in areas HF and HS.
The Babylonian recension is some two centuries younger than the Ninevite recension, and is somewhat abridged.
The Ninevite text (especially K6324+) is especially complex and must be assembled from countless fragments.
941-42 under the Ninevite Istar, while the passage should be restored as [[supURU]ni-nu-a-wi[subi]-n]a [supD]ISTAR-wi[subi]-na (cf.