no-hitter

(redirected from No-hitters)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

no-hit·ter

(nō′hĭt′ər)
n. Baseball
A game in which one pitcher allows the opposing team no hits.

no′-hit′ter



n.
a baseball game in which a pitcher allows no base hits to the opposing team.
[1935–40]
no′-hit`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.no-hitter - a game in which a pitcher allows the opposing team no hits
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
References in periodicals archive ?
TORONTO Justin Verlander took the mound for the ninth inning, fully aware of the no-hitters he finished and his near misses, too.
Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan, who threw one of his record seven no-hitters for Houston, was at Minute Maid Park to see this one.
1 In modern major-league history, 12 combined no-hitters have been pitched.
For example, in an article about no-hitters written roughly one-quarter of the way through the 2018 season, Dave Sheinin states, "Meantime, the league wide batting average of .245 (down 10 points from 2017 and 26 points from 1999) is at a 46-year low." (3) Sheinin is comparing end of season MLB baseball batting averages with an early season MLB batting average.
Retired Major League Baseball pitcher Roy Halladay, who twice won the game's top pitching award and threw one of only two no-hitters in post-season history, died when his small plane crashed off the west coast of central Florida.
Each era in Cubs history includes its own timeline, profiles of key players and coaches, and feature stories that highlight it all, from the heavy hitters to the no-hitters to the one-hit wonders.
"I've been part of a couple no-hitters in my time, but I've never seen a more special performance than that," said Horton, who is in his 20th season as a Division I coach.
Of all those who have ever thrown a baseball, be it in the front yard with their fathers or on the grandest of stages, only one has thrown a pair of Major League no-hitters and struck out 20 batters in one game: Max Scherzer, the 32-year-old Washington Nationals pitcher.
This delightfully written project digs through baseball's 294 no-hitters and presents story after fascinating story about the most compelling characters and unlikely events.
Houston's Jed Lowrie will hit 54 solo ninth-inning homers to break up no-hitters. Pitchers will start to throw at him more.
The authors in this volume do the work of recounting the groundbreaking, barrier-breaking progress that ensued over time in the baseball community and how that translated onto fields and in homes across the country [and] while many expect an exhibition and its companion volume to be focused on important proper names--and they won't be disappointed; those stories are here--the most compelling aspects of Chasing Dreams are the names you don't know, the fans, families, and communities who share the triumphs and disappointments, the statistics and baseball cards, the memories: Where were you on April 15,1947, or on Yom Kippur in 1965; or when Ken Holtzman pitched his two no-hitters; or when Shawn Green hit four home runs; or when the hometown team won the World Series?"
I'm not one of those guys that carried a lot of no-hitters deep into games."