Noachian

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Related to Noachic: Alonzo the Brave

No·a·chi·an

 (nō-ā′kē-ən) also No·ach·ic (-ăk′ĭk) or No·ach·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Bible Of or relating to Noah or his time.
2. Antiquated; ancient; long obsolete.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Noachian

(nəʊˈeɪkɪən) or

Noachic

adj
(Bible) Old Testament of or relating to the patriarch Noah
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

No•a•chi•an

(noʊˈeɪ ki ən) ,

adj.
of or pertaining to the patriarch Noah or his time.
[1670–80; Noach (variant of Noah) + -ian]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Noachian - of or relating to Noah or his time; "Noachian deluge"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether the notion of valid covenant refers to each and every covenant or only to select ones (the Adamic, Noachic, Abrahamic, and Mosaic) has been a matter of debate, which for my purpose here does not require immediate resolution.
It is my contention that the Noachic covenant not only precedes the later covenants but also undergirds them and renders conditions within which they are maintained:
We may also compare Emily Dickinson's Noachic situation, where she puns on ark and Patriarch, and bilingually on Colon's adopted name:
Much excitement was generated by the epic's incorporation of a story about a great deluge that seemed to foreshadow, parallel, and thus, for some, "support" the Noachic flood tale in Genesis.
The subsequent winter storms blowing in off the Pacific Ocean were Noachic in scale.
In 1996, John Woodmorappe published Noah's Ark: A Feasibility Study, which explained the technical feats achieved during the forty days and nights of Noah's Flood, or, to put it in creationist jargon, the "960 continuous hours" of the "Noachic Deluge."
A more substantial literary borrowing (involving the characteristics of Grendel and his mother) of the sort which may originate from the Visio Pauli appears to be, as Ruth Mellinkof has shown, from "an ancient Jewish pseudepigraphical Noah book or (if, as some think, there was no Noah book) pseudepigraphical traditions designated as Noachic" (183).
He wondered if the Noachic flood could have been caused by tidal effects from a grazing collision (or an actual impact) of a comet with the Earth and proposed in effect a comet-induced tsunami.
Blumenbach strongly resisted the claims of "caprice mongers" who, faced with the demise of the convenient Noachic account of division, now sought to establish out of "skin-and-bones" anthropology a physiological relationship between the orangutan and the Negro.
Lambert, in his June 1983 article,"Was the Pre-Flood Animal Kingdom Vegetarian?' solves the Noachic food problem by proposing that all animals including man were vegetarians before the Flood.
This relationship can be rightly seen as covenantal, and Hollander focuses his attention on the Noachic covenant in Genesis, which bound all animals together with us under God's protection.
In fact, however, the representation of certain biblical traditions (e.g., the giving of the Law, the Exodus) in the "Rewritten Bible" was intended to ensure the faithful interpretation and transmission of the respective traditions, so that the resulting texts should be seen as "discourses tied to a founder" (e.g., Mosaic, Adamic, Enochic, Noachic Discourse).73 As far as the Byzantine hymns are concerned, the intention is, of course, the same one professed by Christianity in general: not to abolish the Law or the prophets (Matt 5:17), but to reinterpret them in light of the fundamental assumption that Christ is the telos of the Law (Rom 10:4).