Nollekens


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Nollekens

(ˈnɒləkɪnz)
n
(Biography) Joseph. 1737–1823, British neoclassical sculptor of portrait busts, tombs, and mythological subjects
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In the 18th century, Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, and twice Prime Minister, was painted by Reynolds and sculpted by Nollekens but, more importantly, was an ardent patron of Stubbs.
This logic lies behind Sam Smiles's comment that "London beggars had become too obtrusive in the 1810s to remain safely contained in a picturesque domain." (35) Sam Smiles suggests that Smith's references to the long tradition of painting the poor, from "Michelangelo" (Vagabondiana vi) to Smith's own master, "Nollekens" (Vagabondiana vii), may be intended to reinforce the picturesque containment of the beggars, and what I earlier described as antiquarian and "catalogue" influences on the Vagabondiana must also constitute part of an effort to sustain this containment, as well as function as checks on the kind of response that the Quarterly Review or Select Committee reports aimed to elicit.
Lemuel Francis Abbott shows Joseph Nollekens with his hand leaning on a sculpted head, while Frederic Leighton's self portrait shows him beside the Parthenon frieze.
One can also wonder whether Audran's report of the different sets of measurements in existence explains the personal tone of some of the claims made on some drawings of statues: the eighteenth-century English artist Joseph Nollekens, for instance, on the back of his measured drawings vouches for their accuracy:
(17) John Thomas Smith, Nollekens and his Times, ed.
A further highlight of the early years of the collection is the Joseph Nollekens (d.1823) small-scale terracotta version of Pan copulating with a goat after the myth, which was done from memory by the sculptor having seen the Herculaneum marble original preserved in the Naples Museum during the 1760s.
The English sculptor, Joseph Nollekens, was summoned to take a death mask soon afterwards and from this made 15 busts, with the chest and shoulders modelled later from a Chelsea Pensioner who walked with two wooden legs and a crutch.
Almost 50 years later Roubiliac's bust was again reproduced, this time by Joseph Nollekens. Here the image was paired with a version of Nollekens' bust of Laurence Sterne, so bringing together his own most highly acclaimed portrait with one of Roubiliac's most celebrated images, while at the same time linking the country's leading modern poet with its most admired novelist.
For all his discernment in recognising the genius of Turner and in buying work by other artists such as Joseph Nollekens, John Flaxman and Thomas Phillips, he could offer his patronage to men of considerably lesser talent.
Works by the finest masters of the English school--the foreigners John Michael Rysbrack (1694-1770), Louis-Francois Roubiliac (1702/5-62) and perhaps Joseph Nollekens (1737-1823)-are highly sought after, especially if they are in good condition, original and unusual.