abstract art

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Related to Non-objective art: abstract art

abstract art

An art form that represents ideas (by means of geometric and other designs) instead of natural forms. Compare representational art.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.abstract art - an abstract genre of artabstract art - an abstract genre of art; artistic content depends on internal form rather than pictorial representation
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
op art - a style of abstractionism popular in the 1960s; produces dramatic visual effects with colors and contrasts that are difficult for the eye to resolve
References in periodicals archive ?
Starting in December 1937 and while living in Harrisburg, Penny Cent received monthly stipend support from Philip Guggenheim, founder of the Museum of Non-Objective Art, currently known as the Guggenheim Museum.
* learn to take recycled cardboard and construct it into non-objective art works.
Adjacent to this is Noor Fatima's 'A Moment's Dream', an installation of three painted wooden planks that is simply pure abstraction or non-objective art that sets out to portray no concrete reality at all but works to create a response to the world, rather than functioning as a window through which the artist may view a part of it.
Davidson, along with a number of young artists who studied and exhibited with her, would form the core of Our Little Gallery, an art space that opened in the Montrose district in 1938, and was among the first to feature non-objective art in Houston.
Nakpil, in her essay, 'The Secret Life of Sketches,' writes that Ocampo was a 'sensitive and prophetic artist of the day,' borrowing the words of Hilla Rebay, director for the Museum of Non-Objective Art in New York City.
Solomon, on the other hand, was guided by his mistress, the eccentric and autocratic Baroness Hilla Rebay, who had a Steineresque faith in the spiritual value of non-objective art. In 1937, when Peggy opened Guggenheim Jeune, her gallery in London, Rebay accused her of sullying the family name, 'which stands for an ideal in art', with 'some small shop' that would 'peddle mediocrity'.
Fundamental to those developments was the establishment of abstract or non-objective art in postwar New York, including the final overthrow (British and Irish, please copy!) of the very idea of a 'picture' in painting.

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