noncoincidence

noncoincidence

(ˌnɒnkəʊˈɪnsɪdəns)
n
a failure to meet or agree
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The PPS derivatives mentioned in the previous paragraph should warn us about the noncoincidence between the two varieties.
What really does the concept of the "public" mean, at a moment defined not only by the "structural transformation of the public sphere" (in which the forces of polling, advertising, and public relations have fundamentally altered the meaning of the public in early modern political theory), but also by the emergence of "diasporic public spheres" (in which global cinema, the Internet, and other teletechnical devices allow for a structural noncoincidence between certain public spheres and the territories of the nation-states in which they operate), and the rise of the "society of the spectacle," in which postmodern "images" begin to exercise a new power that resembles nothing so much as the forms of premodern religious belief (Habermas 1991; Appadurai 1996, 21, 36, 101-13; Debord 1995; cf.
It should be noted that when comparing the profiles of surplus electricity and thermal energy available from the grocery store to the typical profiles of residential electricity and thermal energy consumption, a noncoincidence was observed.
In this discussion we see that Deckung, which is sometimes misleadingly translated into English as "coinciding," really implies a kind of overlaying in which difference, or noncoincidence, is preserved.
But, there is also a zone of nonrapport, noncoincidence, nonrecognition, cold interruption, and refusal.
75) On the noncoincidence of these two terms, see Sunderland, "'Imperiia bez imperializma?
Though messianic time is expressed as a noncoincidence or disjointedness, it does not follow that it is internally or even externally structured as consecutive.
Rather, it is something like a time within time--not ulterior but interior--which only measures my disconnection with regard to it, my being out of synch and in noncoincidence with regard to my representation of time, but precisely because of this, allows for the possibility of my achieving and taking hold of it.
Some might say: but what we call "subject" is not the absolute origin, pure will, identity to self, or presence to self of consciousness but precisely this noncoincidence with self.
For Hardt and Negri, as for Geertz, anthropology may be the discipline that has produced static notions of culture and identity, but it is also the discipline capable of destabilizing these notions, with an ever-greater interest in "divergence and multiplicity" and "the noncoincidence of kinds and categories" (Geertz 246).
Again, see Andrew Bennett for an alternative interpretation which argues that Wordsworth's defacement of Coleridge involves a "willed noncoincidence of printed and handwritten poems" (93).