Nonconformists


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Nonconformists

Dissenters from the Church of England.
References in classic literature ?
Charles passed this Act, not because he was sorry for the Nonconformists--as all who would not conform to the Church of England were called--but because he wished to free the Roman Catholics, and he could not do that without freeing the Nonconformists too.
There is nothing in the whole world so unbecoming to a woman as a Nonconformist conscience.
He disappeared into his bedroom and returned in a few minutes in the character of an amiable and simple-minded Nonconformist clergyman.
See the independence in every step: that's his heel on the neck of the oppressor: it's the nonconformist conscience in baggy breeches.
When one examines the remarkable proclivity of the Welsh to religious revivalism, and at least somewhere in Wales experienced a spiritual awakening every year between the mid-18th century and 1905, the extent to which Welsh nonconformists had a generous worldview, that could at times be global in scope, becomes readily apparent.
The critically acclaimed documentary Mala Mala explores the intimate moments, performances, friendships, and activism of Puerto Rican drag queens, trans women, and other gender nonconformists.
Patriots and nonconformists thus differed markedly in how they positioned themselves in and moved through the social world: 'Whereas patriots carefully managed their public appearance, converts paraded their private deeds for other people to examine.
6) Betjeman's treatment of Protestant Nonconformity encompasses a wide array of genres, subjects, and tones, but four recurring rhetorical aims provide a useful structure for analyzing this aspect of his work: praise for the cultural contributions of Nonconformists, laughter at the emotional excesses of their worship, fear of a Calvinistic vision of damnation, and attempts to soothe his own soul by the examples of dissenters' faith.
After 1662, Nonconformists like Henry were barred from graduating from either of the ancient universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
Such nonconformists eventually came also to enjoy access to public office, and toleration was even extended to Unitarians.
This was followed by a long period of suffering for the new nonconformists.
Other Anglican interpreters redirected the apocalypse as much against Protestant nonconformists as against Roman Catholics: they identified the resurrection of the two witnesses as the 1660 re-establishment of monarchy and episcopacy after their destruction by anti-Christian Presbyterians and sectarians.