nonemphatic

Related to nonemphatic: empathetic

nonemphatic

(ˌnɒnɪmˈfætɪk)
adj
lacking emphasis, not emphatic
References in periodicals archive ?
The narrative seeks to satirize and defuse the slur's offensiveness through nonemphatic overuse.
Contrary to the sentences with naa, sentence (17b) readily expresses a neutral (otherwise nonemphatic and noncontrastive) possessive meaning and the possessee can be any type of noun (cf.
Just this year, it includes a broad spectrum of films, from the hand-held approach of "Thirteen" and Robert Altman's fly-on-the-wall look at the Joffrey Ballet in "The Company" to Michael Winterbottom's perfect illusion of a docu for "In This World" and the nonemphatic attitude of finding the extraordinary in the every day in Tom McCarthy's "The Station Agent."
Mill's arguments about the nonemphatic nature of poetry in "What is Poetry?" and "The Two Kinds of Poetry," and his development of a romantic method of critical reading in his essay on Tennyson provide an early-Victorian solution to the problem of critical truth and sincerity by separating the discourses of poetry and philosophy from the perceived corrupting effects of an increasingly rhetorical and "affected" mode of periodical prose writing.
Mill's arguments about the nonemphatic nature of poetry in "What is Poetry?" and "The Two Kinds of Poetry," and his development of a romantic method of critical reading in his essay on Tennyson provide an early Victorian solution to the problem of critical truth and sincerity by separating the discourses of poetry and philosophy from the perceived corrupting effects of an increasingly rhetorical and "affected" mode of periodical prose writing.
This problem, as we shall see, was central to Mill's crisis, and is what motivated his definition of poetry as an intrinsically nonemphatic discourse.
As is well known, there is a particularly strong (synchronic and diachronic) relationship between intensifying self-forms or "emphatic reflexives" on the one hand, and (nonemphatic) reflexives or "reflexive anaphors" on the other.
Having reached the conclusion that ECM occurs with perception verbs selecting a bare complement, we are now left with the question of why the form a surfaces instead of the expected (nonemphatic) form hen, since it is traditionally assumed (e.g.