Nonjurors


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Nonjurors

Anglican clergymen refusing to take the oath of allegiance to William III and Mary II.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) The Anglicans who were committed to cordial relations with Eastern Orthodoxy were often members of the "high church" party in the Church of England, a party composed of Tractarians, NonJurors and their friends.
John Edward Jackson (1805-91), rector of nearby Leigh-Delamere, was employed as "advisory archivist" to the fourth Marquess; (13) he also wrote a History of Longleat (1857), which lingers admiringly over the first Lord Weymouth's patronage of nonjurors, notably the saintly Bishop Ken.
Although Jebb and Anderson, both Nonjurors, maintain a Jacobite focus upon Mary Stuart's character and argue against the authenticity of the casket materials, by reprinting these materials they keep alive her construction as a literary, as well as a political figure, in a departure from her representation in the seventeenth century.
Courts have held that when jurors merely text message, call, or post information online about a case to nonjurors, these are insufficient grounds for a mistrial.
During the Glorious Revolution and its aftermath, Hooker was used against divine right monarchy by supporters of the Revolution and for divine right episcopacy and monarchy by the nonjurors.
The nonjurors Charles Leslie and Samuel Grascome both argued that all Anglicans held the dissenters to be in schism, but Burnet, significantly, prefers to use the term separation.
Considering the book's focus on oaths, one would have liked a longer examination of the Nonjurors who would have provided a useful contrast to the Covenanters.
The second was designed to strengthen the Protestant interest by enforcing the laws against Roman Catholics: Lechmere spoke so virulently on this matter in the House of Commons that a number of Catholics and nonjurors felt they would have to leave the country.
Mark Goldie, "The Nonjurors, Episcopacy, and the Origins of the Convocation Controversy," in Ideology and Conspiracy: Aspects of Jacobitism, 1689-1759, ed.
See also the earlier work of Thomas Lathbury, A History of the Nonjurors (London: Pickering, 1845).
Section 1508 of the federal criminal code bars recording of the deliberations or voting of grand or petit juries; the statute also bars nonjurors from listening to or observing such proceedings.
In our system, a properly informed criminal jury given the proper evidence is always entitled to acquit a defendant; no other official can reverse that decision, no matter how "erroneous" it seems to nonjurors.