nonsmoker

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non·smok·er

 (nŏn′smō′kər)
n.
One who does not smoke tobacco.

nonsmoker

(ˌnɒnˈsməʊkə)
n
1. a person who does not smoke
2. (Railways) a train compartment in which smoking is forbidden
ˌnonˈsmoking adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nonsmoker - a person who does not smoke tobaccononsmoker - a person who does not smoke tobacco
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
smoker, tobacco user - a person who smokes tobacco
2.nonsmoker - a passenger car for passengers who want to avoid tobacco smoke
carriage, passenger car, coach - a railcar where passengers ride
Translations

nonsmoker

[ˈnɒnˈsməʊkəʳ] n
a. (person) → non fumatore/trice
I'm a nonsmoker → non fumo
References in periodicals archive ?
Exposure to secondhand smoke from burning tobacco products can cause sudden infant death syndrome, respiratory infections, ear infections, and asthma attacks in infants and children, and coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer in adult nonsmokers (1).
Smokers and former smokers with chronic sinusitis have worse symptoms and quality of life than non-smokers, but with each passing year after you quit, your symptoms improve and can approach those of nonsmokers over time, a recent study suggests.
Goldstein (1991), for example, found that nonsmokers favored nonsmokers over smokers as measured by self-report.
The analysis of normal ECG waves of control smokers and non-smokers indicated significantly shortened QRS complex (P < 0.001) and shortened ST interval (P < 0.001) in smokers than nonsmokers (Table 4) indicating incomplete ventricular filling.
5.3% of nonsmokers where Christians compared to only 1.3% of the smokers.
The nonsmokers, continued smokers, and quitters were comparable at baseline.
Each year, around 20,000 American nonsmokers die of lung cancer.
The researchers used mortality rate ratios to compare death rates in smokers and nonsmokers. This type of analysis weighs the impact of standard death risk factors like age and sex (male or female) and HIV-specific risk factors (like CD4 count and time taking antiretroviral therapy).
Nonsmokers are also at risk from secondary hookah smoke, just like with cigars and cigarettes.
There was no statistically significant difference in the FVC and [FEV.sub.1]/FVC ratio among smokers and nonsmokers.
Researchers collected dust samples from the private homes of smokers and nonsmokers, finding that for children ages 1 year old to 6 years old, cancer risks exceeded recommended U.S.