Norman Conquest

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Norman Conquest

n.
The conquest of England by the Normans under William the Conqueror, especially the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Norman Conquest

n
(Historical Terms) the invasion and settlement of England by the Normans, following the Battle of Hastings (1066)

Nor′man Con′quest


n.
the conquest of England by the Normans in 1066.
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Noun1.Norman Conquest - the invasion and settlement of England by the Normans following the battle of Hastings (1066)Norman Conquest - the invasion and settlement of England by the Normans following the battle of Hastings (1066)
battle of Hastings, Hastings - the decisive battle in which William the Conqueror (duke of Normandy) defeated the Saxons under Harold II (1066) and thus left England open for the Norman Conquest
References in periodicals archive ?
Harold reigned from January 6, 1066 until his death at the Battle of Hastings on October 14 that year, fighting the invaders led by William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England.
Baswell explains that Kim studies Christian manuscripts, with a particular focus on those intended for the use of secular women, nuns and religious recluses in the period after the Norman Conquest of England.
It could be the Romans only getting so far into Scotland, the Norman conquest of England or maybe shades of the Auld Alliance.
The Norman conquest of England was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Normans, Bretons and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later William the Conqueror.
The Berkeley family is recognised in British noble history for having an unbroken, identifiable male line of descent from a Saxon ancestor who lived before the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.
The original tapestry is nearly 70 metres (230 ft) long and depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England by William the Conqueror against his opponent Harold, Earl of Wessex, and culminates in the Battle of Hastings.