Normandy


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Related to Normandy: Normandy Invasion

Nor·man·dy

 (nôr′mən-dē)
A historical region and former province of northwest France on the English Channel. Part of ancient Gaul, the region was successively conquered by the Romans, Franks, and Norse; during the Middle Ages it was sporadically controlled by the Anglo-Norman kings of England, but passed permanently to France in 1450. Its beaches were the focal point of Allied landings on D-day (June 6, 1944) in World War II.

Normandy

(ˈnɔːməndɪ)
n
(Placename) a former province of N France, on the English Channel: settled by Vikings under Rollo in the 10th century; scene of the Allied landings in 1944. Chief town: Rouen. French name: Normandie

Nor•man•dy

(ˈnɔr mən di)

n.
a historic region in NW France along the English Channel: Allied invasion in World War II began here June 6, 1944.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Normandy - a former province of northwestern France on the English channelNormandy - a former province of northwestern France on the English channel; divided into Haute-Normandie and Basse-Normandie
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Basse-Normandie, Lower-Normandy - a division of Normandy
Haute-Normandie, Upper-Normandy - a division of Normandy
Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Translations
Normandia
Normandia
Normandia
NormandieNormandiet

Normandy

[ˈnɔːməndɪ] NNormandía f

Normandy

[ˈnɔːrməndi] nNormandie f
in Normandy → en Normandie
to Normandy → en Normandie

Normandy

nNormandie f

Normandy

[ˈnɔːməndɪ] nNormandia
References in classic literature ?
Conan, Duke of Brittany, and William, Duke of Normandy, were related to each other, and in a manner the Bretons owned the Duke of Normandy as overlord.
Don't you really know, Durbeyfield, that you are the lineal representative of the ancient and knightly family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent from Sir Pagan d'Urberville, that renowned knight who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, as appears by Battle Abbey Roll?
Bertuccio," said he, "I intend going this evening to Normandy, instead of to-morrow or the next day.
Milesian = slang for Irish, from Milesius, mythical Spanish conqueror of Ireland; Evreux = town in Normandy, France; a D'Uzes = a member of an ancient noble family in southern France}
Normandy and Picardy had taken positions in the rocks dominated by the heights of the mountain, upon the declivity of which were raised the bastions of Gigelli.
They were a large kind of "chaluts," like those on the Normandy coasts, great pockets that the waves and a chain fixed in the smaller meshes kept open.
As he left no children, his estate was inherited by his nephew, from whom is descended the present Marquis of Normandy.
The class are going for a sketching tour to Normandy," she said, "and Mr.
When they are, it is easier to hold them, especially when they have not been accustomed to self- government; and to hold them securely it is enough to have destroyed the family of the prince who was ruling them; because the two peoples, preserving in other things the old conditions, and not being unlike in customs, will live quietly together, as one has seen in Brittany, Burgundy, Gascony, and Normandy, which have been bound to France for so long a time: and, although there may be some difference in language, nevertheless the customs are alike, and the people will easily be able to get on amongst themselves.
Come, Athos and Aramis, go to the right; Porthos, come with me to the left; these gentlemen should file off into Normandy, whilst we, by the nearest road, reach Paris.
Those bands of them with whom we are here concerned, and who became known distinctively as Normans, fastened themselves as settlers, early in the eleventh century, on the northern shore of France, and in return for their acceptance of Christianity and acknowledgment of the nominal feudal sovereignty of the French king were recognized as rightful possessors of the large province which thus came to bear the name of Normandy.
A circumstance which greatly tended to enhance the tyranny of the nobility, and the sufferings of the inferior classes, arose from the consequences of the Conquest by Duke William of Normandy.